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Tuesday, August 20
 

17:00 EEST

Excursion. Tallinn Old Town: Tourism and Historical Environment (registered participants)
Start of the excursion: 17:00  Town Hall Square under the clock of the Town Hall
End of the excursion: 19:00  Kohtu Street viewing platform in Toompea 

Explore the medieval Tallinn Old Town and the effects of tourism on historical urban environment in a two-hour participatory experience. We start from the Town Hall Square under the clock and end in Kohtu St viewing platform. During the excursion, we are seeing some of the historic landmarks and discuss how they are exposed and hidden in the city. The walking tour includes climbing the stairs to the Dome Hill, with 157 steps.

Speakers
TP

Tiina Peil

Södertörn University


Tuesday August 20, 2019 17:00 - 18:00 EEST
Town Hall Square (under the clock)

18:30 EEST

ESEH Next Generation Action Team Pub Night at Club Noku in Old Town (Pikk street 5, code for door lock 2580)
Come join the ESEH Next Generation Action Team pub night!
Where: NOKU Club (Pikk 5) - password for door lock 2580
When: Tuesday, August 20, 18.30
Contact person: Roberta Biasillo - biasillo@kth.se  
 
We are happy to invite all participants at the conference to their first official event on August 20 as a sort of kick-off meeting of the conference. The event format will be a pub night targeting primarily doc and post-doctoral researchers, their needs and aspirations, meanwhile scholars at all stages are most welcome to share their experiences, have a chat over a beer, support and been informed about the activities of the NEXTGATe.
 
Marco Armiero, Szabó Péter, and Anna-Katharina Woebse have confirmed their presence, along the six members of the NEXTGATe (Viktor Pál, Roberta Biasillo, Elena Kochetkova, Tayler Meredith, Simone Schleper, Erin Spinney).
 
For more information about NEXTGATe´s activities and agenda, read this short article (available open access) “Emerging Scholars in the Age of Uncertainty: Goals and Plans of ESEH Next Generation Action Team in 2018–19”, Environment and History 2018, Vol. 24. No. 4. P. 579-581.
 
The pub would like to know in advance how many of us will roughly take part in the event, thus if you are willing to come we would really appreciate if you could drop Roberta Biasillo a line (biasillo@kth.se) by August 17.
 
Happy to answer any questions or concerns!
 
If you can make it a bit earlier, on August 20 at the same venue from 16.30-18.30 we will invite you to meet the Helsinki Environmental Humanities. Mikko Saikku leads a research program that partly focusing on Envhum and from 2020 Helsinki they will likely have an Envhum study program so we could talk about present activities and future plans with anyone interested. 
 
Everyone is welcome!
 
ESEH Next Generation Action Team

Speakers
RB

Roberta Biasillo

KTH Environmental Humanities Laboratory, Stockholm
EK

Elena Kochetkova

National Research University Higher School of Economics - St. Petersburg
avatar for Simone Schleper

Simone Schleper

Librarian/ Postdoc, Maastricht University


Tuesday August 20, 2019 18:30 - 22:30 EEST
Noku Club in Old Town
 
Wednesday, August 21
 

09:00 EEST

Registration (with welcome snack)
Registration and information desk is situated on the first floor of Astra building. The opening times of the registration and information desk are as follows:

Wednesday, August 21, 9:00-19:00
Thursday, August 22, 8:30-19:00
Friday, August 23, 8:30-19:00
Saturday, August 24, 8:30-18:00

Wednesday August 21, 2019 09:00 - 11:00 EEST
Astra building, entrance

09:30 EEST

ESEH outgoing Regional Representatives meeting in room A-354
The 2017-2019 Council of Regional Representatives meets.




Wednesday August 21, 2019 09:30 - 11:00 EEST
A-354

11:00 EEST

1A: Fluid boundaries: Imagination, appropriation and reaffirmation of wetlands in past and present
Organizer: Anna-Katharina Wöbse, Justus-Liebig Universität Gießen
Chair: Pavla Šimková, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich / Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society

Bio- or noosphere? Wetland protection in the late Soviet Union
Katja Bruisch, Trinity College Dublin

“Adaptable” wetland conservation in China: A spatial history of wetlands in Chongming Island
Linjun Xie, University of Nottingham

A shared experience of loss: How marshes, bogs and wadden turned into European wetlands
Anna-Katharina Wöbse, Justus-Liebig Universität Gießen

Comment: Liesbeth van de Grift, Utrecht University

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
PS

Pavla Šimková

Rachel Carson Center, LMU Munich

Speakers
LX

Linjun Xie

University of Nottingham Ningbo China
avatar for Anna-Katharina Wöbse

Anna-Katharina Wöbse

University of Giessen
LV

Liesbeth van de Grift

Associate Professor, Utrecht University
KB

Katja Bruisch

Trinity College Dublin
Soviet Union, Imperial Russia, wetlands, energy, land-use change



Wednesday August 21, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
S-240

11:00 EEST

1B: Disasters past and future
Chair: Santiago Gorostiza, ICTA - Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

Struggling with drought in the Mediterranean during the Little Ice Age. The case of Barcelona (1603 – 1651)
Santiago Gorostiza, ICTA - Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona; Maria Antònia Martí Escayol, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

Natural disasters and the shifts of boundaries
Muzayin Nazaruddin, University of Tartu, Universitas Islam Indonesia

The historical spectre of calamities: plant pests and extreme climatic events
Inês Gomes, University of Lisbon; Ana Isabel Queiroz, University of Lisbon; Inês Amorim, University of Porto, CITCEM/FLUP

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Santiago Gorostiza

Santiago Gorostiza

Postdoctoral researcher, Santiago Gorostiza Langa
I am currently on a research stay at the University of Lund (Sweden). Next January I am starting a new position in Paris, for three years!I am interested in:Environmental history of warFascism and natureHuman impacts of the Little Ice Age

Speakers
MA

Maria Antònia Martí Escayol

Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
MN

Muzayin Nazaruddin

Doctoral Student, University of Tartu
avatar for Inês Amorim

Inês Amorim

Professor, Transdisciplinary Research Centre «Culture, Space and Memory» (CITCEM/FLUP)
FisheriesSalt historyHistory of ScienceClimate HistoryCrop Losses
avatar for Ana Isabel Queiroz

Ana Isabel Queiroz

Researcher, IHC, NOVA-FCSH, Portugal
History of plant pests Starvation, hunger and faminesHistory of nature protection and conservation.



Wednesday August 21, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
M-225

11:00 EEST

1C: Science of defining the healthy environment
Organizer: Tuomas Räsänen, University of Turku
Chair: Hrvoje Petrić, University of Zagreb

Embodied Environments: Drawing the Line between Healthy and Unhealthy Environments in the Late 19th and Early 20th Century European Natural Healing Movement
Suvi Rytty, University of Turku

The quantification of harm and tackling urban air pollution in post-WWII Helsinki
Paula Schönach, University of Helsinki

Measuring Health and Air: WHO’s Problem of Defining Safe Levels for Air Pollution in mid-20th Century
Janne Mäkiranta, University of Turku

When Food Kills: Assessing the Limits of Toxic Substances in Fish
Tuomas Räsänen, University of Turku

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Hrvoje Petrić

Hrvoje Petrić

University of Zagreb

Speakers
SR

Suvi Rytty

University of Turku
PS

Paula Schönach

University of Helsinki
JM

Janne Mäkiranta

University of Turku
TR

Tuomas Räsänen

Assistant professor, University of Turku



Wednesday August 21, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
S-238

11:00 EEST

1D: Nuclear installations at the border. Transnational connections and international implications
Organizer: Astrid Mignon Kirchhof, Humboldt University of Berlin
Chair: Melina Buns, University of Oslo

Siting (and mining) at the border: Spain–Portugal nuclear transboundary issues
María del Mar Rubio-Varas, Institute for Advanced Research in Business and Economics (INARBE)
António Carvalho, Centro de Estudos Sociais, Universidade de Coimbra
Joseba de la Torre, Economics Department, Universidad Pública de Navarra

East–West German transborder entanglements through the nuclear waste sites in Gorleben and Morsleben
Astrid Mignon Kirchhof, Humboldt University of Berlin

“The world´s worst located nuclear power plant”: Danish and Swedish cross-border perspectives on the Barsebäck nuclear power plant
Arne Kaijser, KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Jan-Henrik Meyer, University of Copenhagen / Center for Contemporary History, Potsdam

Comment: Astrid M. Eckert, Emory University

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
MA

Melina Antonia Buns

PhD Candidate, University of Oslo

Speakers
AC

António Carvalho

Research Fellow, Centre for Social Studies, University of Coimbra
avatar for Astrid Mignon Kirchhof

Astrid Mignon Kirchhof

Research Associate, Humboldt University, Berlin
I am an environmental historian of history of ideas and political ecology of socialist and free market societies, esp. West and East Germany.
JM

Jan-Henrik Meyer

Researcher, Max Planck Institute for European Legal History
AM

Astrid M. Eckert

Associate Professor, Emory University



Wednesday August 21, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
A-325

11:00 EEST

1E: Traditional agricultural practices
Chair: May-Brith Ohman Nielsen, University of Agder

Desert and dynamics of camel management in Early Modern times
Nitin Goyal, University of Delhi

Traditional agriculture and biocultural landscapes: Disentangling the rationality of a past alley-cropping system in Les Oluges (Catalonia, Spain, 1860–1959)
Lucía Díez Sanjuán, University of Barcelona

Traditional ecological knowledge in the Brazilian production of yerba mate
Alessandra Carvalho, State University of Ponta Grossa
Robson Laverdi, State University of Ponta Grossa
Evelyn Nimmo, State University of Ponta Grossa

The decline of slash and burn cultivation in Livonia
Pille Tomson, Estonian University of Life Sciences

Abstracts available

Moderators
MO

May-Brith Ohman Nielsen

Professor, University of Agder

Speakers
LD

Lucía Díez Sanjuán

PhD Student, University of Barcelona
PT

Pille Tomson

specialist, Estonian University of Life Sciences



Wednesday August 21, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
M-213

11:00 EEST

1F: Suburbanizing environmental history
Organizer: Stéphane Frioux, LARHRA-Université de Lyon
Chair: Renaud Bécot, LARHRA-Université de Lyon

When an improved metropolis meant a more hazardous suburb: A case study of London and its neighbour Chiswick, 1850–1930
Tracey Logan, Centre for Urban History, University of Leicester

The paradoxes of the long-term urban environmental transition: The agglomeration of Lyon, France (1960s–1990s)
Stéphane Frioux, LARHRA-Université de Lyon



Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
RB

Renaud Bécot

LARHRA, CNRS - University of Lyon

Speakers
avatar for Tracey Logan

Tracey Logan

PhD Researcher, University of Leicester
I am interested in the experience of districts close to cities, as cities grow. My research studies three at the urban edge of London between 1895 and 1927. Normally such districts are viewed from the perspective of the city centre, not from their own position as urban outsiders... Read More →
avatar for Stéphane Frioux

Stéphane Frioux

Maītre de conférences, Université Lyon 2
urban environmental historian, specialist of air pollution management in 20th century France. Interested in urban pollution in general, green politics and environmentalism.



Wednesday August 21, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
A-402

11:00 EEST

1G: Roundtable. Environmental history and historical ecology: Boundaries and connections between the humanities and the natural sciences
Organizer: Radim Hédl, Institute of Botany of the Czech Academy of Sciences
Chair: Martin Schmid, Institute of Social Ecology, BOKU

Radim Hédl, Institute of Botany of the Czech Academy of Sciences
Gertrud Haidvogl, Institute of Hydrobiology, BOKU
Triin Reitalu, Tallinn University of Technology
Giuseppe Bazan, University of Palermo
Péter Szabó, Institute of Botany of the Czech Academy of Sciences

Abstract:
Since its beginnings, environmental history has had strong connections with various branches of the natural sciences, especially with ecology. Even though some parts of ecology, for example evolutionary and palaeoecology, have a natural inclination towards the past, a more pronounced ‘historical turn’ within ecology worldwide has occurred since the 1990s. Interest in long-term changes in landscapes and vegetation to understand current ecological patterns and processes is underlined by the recent formation of the Historical Vegetation Ecology Working Group within the International Association for Vegetation Science (IAVS) and the Historical Landscape Ecology Working group within the International Association for Landscape Ecology (IALE).
Environmental historians and vegetation and landscape ecologists obviously have much to share and their research can be in many senses complementary and synergetic. However, there are also boundaries apparent between these disciplines, and these boundaries are not stable but are constantly reformed. Rather than striving for exclusive definitions of their respective disciplines, participants of this roundtable will aim to engage in a discussion about what the humanities and natural sciences can offer to each other and whether common research agendas may exist to pursue shared goals and how these agendas can be implemented. Participants will also reflect on the often sweeping changes that have affected both the humanities and the natural sciences since the beginnings of their cooperation. In particular the emergence of environmental humanities, into which environmental history is now firmly integrated, and the turn towards statistics, models and big data in ecology will be discussed to map the future of interdisciplinary cooperation between environmental history and historical ecology.


Moderators
avatar for Martin Schmid

Martin Schmid

Associate Professor, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna (BOKU)

Speakers
RH

Radim Hédl

Institute of Botany, Czech Academy of Sciences
GH

Gertrud Haidvogl

Senior Scientist, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Institute of Hydrobiology and Aquatic Ecosystem Management
avatar for Giuseppe Bazan

Giuseppe Bazan

Professor, University of Palermo
avatar for Péter Szabó

Péter Szabó

Institute of Botany of the Czech Academy of Sciences



Wednesday August 21, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
A-121

11:00 EEST

1H: Business and the environment
Chair: Erland Mårald, Umeå University

Sustainability in concepts of the factory of the future
Nora Thorade, Helmut Schmidt University

Changing the pulp and paper landscape in Austria: The impact of the European Recovery Program on Austrian pulp and paper production sites
Sofie Mittas, Johannes Kepler University Linz

The use of business records for environmental history: Nineteenth century English smoke pollution
Ayuka Kasuga, Hiroshima University

Abstract available HERE

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Nora Thorade

Nora Thorade

TU Darmstadt
SM

Sofie Mittas

PhD student, Johannes Kepler University, Linz
AK

Ayuka Kasuga

Associate Professor, Hiroshima University



Wednesday August 21, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
S-236

11:00 EEST

1I: Industry, science and the birth of environmental legislation in Europe (1800–1950s)
Organizers: Andrei Vinogradov & Anna Mazanik, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society
Chair: Maya K. Peterson, University of California, Santa Cruz

Movements against industrial pollution in the late Russian Empire
Andrei Vinogradov, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society

River pollution and environmental law in Russia, 1880-1917
Anna Mazanik, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society

Law and the Beast: European bison as the first protected species in the Russian Empire
Anastasia Fedotova, Institute for the History of Science and Technology, Russian Academy of Science

Discussants:
Elena Kochetkova, National Research University Higher School of Economics
Valentina Roxo, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society

Abstract available HERE

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Anna Mazanik

Anna Mazanik

Research fellow, Academic Coordinator of the Doctoral Program "Environment and Society", Rachel Carson Center
AV

Andrei Vinogradov

Doctoral student, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society
avatar for Anastasia Fedotova

Anastasia Fedotova

senior researcher, Institute for the History of Science and Technology, Russian Academy of Science; Mammal Research Institute Polish Acade
avatar for Valentina Roxo

Valentina Roxo

Doctoral candidate, Rachel Carson Center
Russian and Soviet environmental history
EK

Elena Kochetkova

National Research University Higher School of Economics - St. Petersburg



Wednesday August 21, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
A-224

11:00 EEST

1J: Roundtable. Bounded tongues: Rethinking the environmental humanities through the challenges of translation
Organizer: Anna Antonova, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society
Chair: Kati Lindström, KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Daniele Valisena, KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Anna Antonova, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society
Sarah Yoho, University of Leeds
Jeroen Oomen, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society / Deutsches Museum
Roger Norum, University of Oulu

Abstract:
Environmental history, and the environmental humanities more broadly, have made great advances in thinking across a variety of disciplinary, material, and scalar boundaries: they bridge the social with the natural, the imaginative with the physical, the human with the nonhuman, the local with the global. Yet language remains one of the boundaries that these disciplines do not easily traverse. Despite the increased application of environmental history and the environmental humanities across a variety of academic and non-academic contexts, their philosophical roots and core terminologies remain largely grounded, and exercised, predominantly in the Anglo-phone tradition (as witnessed, incidentally, by this international conference’s official language). Yet translating the disciplines and adapting discourses for different linguistic and cultural contexts inevitably entails numerous changes in a scholar’s epistemic approach. As Derrida (1976) noted, “language is an iterable trace”, one that has a history and that “leaves a sometimes-deceiving trail”. 
For example, many of the fields’ terminologies and theoretical frameworks may not translate easily outside of the English language – or, for that matter, outside European or American contexts. Even foundational terms such as “environment”, “landscape”, or “nature” often have vastly different connotations when translated. Further, many of the historic debates supported by the fields are conceived differently in, or at times are wholly irrelevant to, non-English cultures. How, then, do environmental history and the environmental humanities change – philosophically and epistemologically – when they are translated? How might we profit, and how might we challenge our respective disciplines, if we reflect on these linguistic changes? These are some of the central questions explored by this roundtable. The session features young scholars from diverse linguistic and national backgrounds who have applied environmental humanities approaches in a number of languages and cultural contexts, among them Bulgarian, Dutch, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Polish, and Swedish.

Moderators
avatar for Kati Lindström

Kati Lindström

KTH Royal Institute of Technology / KAJAK
I am the ESEH Regional Representative for the Baltic States - come and join our BALTEHUMS lunch on August 21 if you are interested in the Baltic environmental humanities and social sciences.

Speakers
JO

Jeroen Oomen

Utrecht University
avatar for Daniele Valisena

Daniele Valisena

PhD, KTH - Royal Institute of Technology
avatar for Sarah Elizabeth Yoho

Sarah Elizabeth Yoho

PhD Candidate, University of Leeds
I'm an environmental anthropologist working in the nexus between tourism, mobility and environmental change. My PhD work is based in Cinque Terre, Italy. I'm an Environmental Humanities Marie Curie ESR and am currently a visiting PhD scholar at the Rachel Carson Center in Munich... Read More →
avatar for Anna Antonova

Anna Antonova

Researcher in Residence, Rachel Carson Center
Researcher in Residence at the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society at LMU Munich



Wednesday August 21, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
M-340

12:30 EEST

Lunch
Warm lunch is served in two locations: Mare Atrium and Astra Resarchers' Forum.
You can also bring your lunch over to the BALTEHUMS lunch in A-354.

Wednesday August 21, 2019 12:30 - 14:00 EEST
Mare Atrium, 3rd floor / Researchers' Forum in Astra Building

12:30 EEST

Open BALTEHUMS Lunch
Baltic Environmental Humanities and Social Sciences (BALTEHUMS) network open lunch meeting. Grab your lunch and join us in room A-354!
All people interested in the Environmental Humanities and Social Sciences of and in the Baltic region are welcome to join the BALTEHUMS lunch.
The agenda for the meeting will be first and foremost to meet old and new friends interested in the environmental humanities and social sciences of the Baltic region, but secondly, to discuss the need and timing for a next BALTEHUMS conference. Do we think that the second BALTEHUMS should take place?

Speakers
avatar for Kati Lindström

Kati Lindström

KTH Royal Institute of Technology / KAJAK
I am the ESEH Regional Representative for the Baltic States - come and join our BALTEHUMS lunch on August 21 if you are interested in the Baltic environmental humanities and social sciences.



Wednesday August 21, 2019 12:30 - 14:00 EEST
A-354

14:00 EEST

Keynote: Prof. Kate Brown, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The Great Chernobyl Acceleration
Chair: Aro Velmet, University of Southern California / University of Oxford

Keynotes are held in two rooms. Primary room:  A002 (Auditorium Maximum) and second room with a video bridge and more oxygen at A222 (European Hall).  Both audiences get to ask questions!
Live feed:  http://trummiporin.eu/live/eseh/

Abstract
In April 1986, the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant exploded and sent upwards of 50 millioncuries into the surrounding environment. Brown argues that to call this event an “accident” is tosweep aside radioactive incidents in the region that occurred before and after the accident. In the 1960s, Soviet researchers learned that the people living in the Pripyat Marshes surrounding the Chernobyl Plant had 30 times more radioactive cesium in their bodies due to fallout from nuclear testing. In the decades after the 1986, the KGB recorded over a dozen nuclear accidents at Ukrainian nuclear power plants, while fires in the Chernobyl Zone volatized radioactivity stored in trees and the leaf litter and resurrected it. Instead of a one-off accident, Brown argues that Chernobyl was a point of acceleration on a timeline of radioactive contamination that continues to this day.

Short bio:
Kate Brown is Professor of History in the Science, Technology and Society Department of Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She is the author of the prize-winning histories Plutopia: Nuclear Families in Atomic Cities and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters (Oxford 2013) and A Biography of No Place: From Ethnic Borderland to Soviet Heartland (Harvard 2004). Brown was a 2009 Guggenheim Fellow. Her work has also been supported by the Carnegie Foundation, the NEH, ACLS, IREX, and the American Academy of Berlin, among others. Her latest book, Manual for Survival: A Chernobyl Guide to the Future will be published by Norton (US), Penguin Lane (UK) and Czarne (Poland) in spring 2019 and by Actes Sud in France in October 2019.

Speakers
avatar for Kate Brown

Kate Brown

Professor, MIT
I am a historian of environmental and nuclear history. My most recent book is Manual for Survival: A Chernobyl Guide to the Future [https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/309/309235/manual-for-survival/9780241352069.html]
AV

Aro Velmet

Assistant Professor, University of Southern California



Wednesday August 21, 2019 14:00 - 15:30 EEST
A002 / A222

15:30 EEST

Book launch coffee break
Book launch coffee break at Researchers’ Forum in Astra building.
Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society and the Berghahn Publishers present Environment in History series


Wednesday August 21, 2019 15:30 - 16:00 EEST
Researchers' Forum in Astra Building

15:30 EEST

Coffee break
Coffee breaks are served in two areas: in Mare Atrium and Researchers' Forum.
In the latter it is accompanied by a book launch.


Wednesday August 21, 2019 15:30 - 16:00 EEST
Mare Atrium, 3rd floor / Researchers' Forum in Astra Building

16:00 EEST

2A: Fluid borders: Transboundary river regimes and the environment on the Rhine, the Ohio and the Elbe River in the 19th and 20th centuries
Organizer: Geneviève Massard-Guilbaud, École des hautes études en sciences sociales, Paris
Chair: Geneviève Massard-Guilbaud, École des hautes études en sciences sociales, Paris

Struggles on transboundary water management and environmental justice along the Rhine (19th/20th century)
Christoph Bernhardt, Leibniz Institute for Research on Society and Space in Erkner, Berlin / Humboldt University of Berlin

Crossing the Ohio river: Environmental perspectives of the underground railroad
Uwe Lübken, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich

Wilhelmsburg in motion: River migration and mobility amidst the Elbe
Felix Mauch, Technical University Munich

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
GM

Geneviève Massard-Guilbaud

Professor, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales Paris

Speakers
CB

Christoph Bernhardt

Head of Department, Leibniz-Institute for Research on Society and Space
UL

Uwe Lübken

Professor, LMU Munich
avatar for Felix Mauch

Felix Mauch

TU Munich



Wednesday August 21, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
S-240

16:00 EEST

2B: Roundtable. Future directions of climate history
Organizer: Katrin Kleemann, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society / Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich
Chair: Kathleen Pribyl, University of East Anglia

Dominik Collet, University of Oslo
Gemma Ives, University of Sheffield
Árni Daníel Júlíusson, Reykjavik Academy / University of Iceland
Katrin Kleemann, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society / Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich
Astrid E. J. Ogilvie, Stefansson Arctic Institute / University of Colorado at Boulder

Abstract:
Climate history reconstructs past climate changes, investigates how they impacted human history, and studies how they were represented in past cultures. It takes into consideration the current anthropogenic climate change our world is facing and other periods of climatic change. In the past, this change was caused by volcanic or solar forcing, positive feedback loops, and/or changes in oceanic or atmospheric currents, to name but a few. Over the course of the Common Era, periods such as the Dark Ages Cold Period/Late Antique Little Ice Age (410-775/536-660), Medieval Climate Anomaly (900-1400), or Little Ice Age (1300-1850) are characterized by a change in average weather over at least 30 years. Societies and communities around the globe struggled and sometimes thrived to adapt to an increased frequency of extreme weather, such as storms, floods, droughts, or heat waves. 
Climate history is an interdisciplinary field. Natural scientists retrieve proxy data from the archives of nature, such as ice cores, tree rings, and stalagmites, and reconstruct the climate. Historians analyze the archives of society and reconstruct weather and climatic trends from historical documents such as diary entries, meteorological observations, or letters. The close collaboration of natural scientists and climate historians has produced several studies in recent years; nevertheless, climate history is a fairly young discipline. 
The participants of this roundtable will discuss where climate history is at as a discipline and which directions it can and might take in the future. The chair will open the session with a short introduction, the participants will give circa 5-minute long lightning talks on where they see the most exciting areas of study in the field of climate history in the future. In these short talks, the participants will highlight areas of study that are understudied, where the boundaries of the field may lie or which areas may require reevaluation or closer collaboration with scientists. The participants will then comment on the lightning talks of the others before the floor is opened to the audience for comments, and to ask questions.

Moderators
KP

Kathleen Pribyl

University of East Anglia

Speakers
avatar for Dominik Collet

Dominik Collet

Professor, University of Oslo
GI

Gemma Ives

PhD Student, The University of Sheffield
AD

Árni Daníel Júlíusson

Research specialist, University of Iceland
avatar for Katrin Kleemann

Katrin Kleemann

Doctoral Candidate, Rachel Carson Center / LMU Munich
I'm a doctoral candidate at the Rachel Carson Center in Munich. I'm working on the Laki Fissure eruption in Iceland in 1783. I'd love to talk about volcanic eruptions, geology, climate history, and early modern history!
AE

Astrid E. J. Ogilvie

Senior scientist, Stefansson Arctic Institute



Wednesday August 21, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
M-225

16:00 EEST

2C: Scientific measurement of the environment
Chair: Otto Latva, University of Turku

From bomb to bone: Youth, radiation, and postwar ecology
Jeffrey Sanders, Washington State University

Measuring nature: The history of defining a zero
Petra J.E.M. van Dam, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Setting the boundary: Humans, animals and debates over toxic substances in nineteenth-century France and Britain
Amelie Bonney, University of Oxford

Who is afraid of biodiversity? Reconstructing and understanding biodiversity change in the Netherlands (1900–2015)
Thomas van Goethem, Utrecht University
Jan Luiten van Zanden, Utrecht University

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Otto Latva

Otto Latva

Volunteer/ postdoc / visiting researcher of Tallinn University, Åbo Akademi University
I am a historian and writer, specialized in human-animal studies and the ways in which people of the past perceived the sea environment. I am also interested in many other matters related to the shared past between humans and non-humans. I have a PhD in Cultural History from the University... Read More →

Speakers
JS

Jeffrey Sanders

Associate Professor, Washington State University
avatar for Petra J. E. M. van Dam

Petra J. E. M. van Dam

prof. dr., Free University Amsterdam
I focus on the environmental, social-economic, political and cultural aspects of the relationships between humans, animals, water, and landscape in the past. With my historical projects I want to promote environmental awareness and contribute to the transition to a more sustainable... Read More →
avatar for Amelie Bonney

Amelie Bonney

Doctoral Student, University of Oxford
My research focuses on the construction of expert knowledge on toxic colours in France and Britain between 1830 and 1914, more specifically at its intersections with environmental hazards and occupational disease. Feel free to chat with me during the conference! Here are some of the... Read More →
TV

Thomas van Goethem

Utrecht University



Wednesday August 21, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
S-238

16:00 EEST

2D: Radiation does not stop at the border! International organisations and the transboundary environmental effects of nuclear power
Organizer: Jan-Henrik Meyer, Max-Planck Institute for European Legal History
Chair: Astrid Mignon Kirchhof, Humboldt University of Berlin / Deutsches Museum

Passing the radioactive buck: The long-lasting legacy of a “short-term phenomenon”
Melina Buns, University of Oslo

National sovereignty vs transboundary environmental risks: How the European communities failed to make rules regarding cross-border consultation on nuclear power plants in the 1970s
Jan-Henrik Meyer, Max-Planck Institute for European Legal History

Stakeholder engagement as a means of managing transboundary environmental issues: The evolving role of the OECD-NEA
Markku Lehtonen, Pompeu Fabra University

Comment: Liesbeth van de Grift, Utrecht University

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Astrid Mignon Kirchhof

Astrid Mignon Kirchhof

Research Associate, Humboldt University, Berlin
I am an environmental historian of history of ideas and political ecology of socialist and free market societies, esp. West and East Germany.

Speakers
LV

Liesbeth van de Grift

Associate Professor, Utrecht University
MA

Melina Antonia Buns

PhD Candidate, University of Oslo
JM

Jan-Henrik Meyer

Researcher, Max Planck Institute for European Legal History
avatar for Markku Lehtonen

Markku Lehtonen

Researcher, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona
I am currently a Marie Curie-Sklodowska Individual Fellow at the University Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona, working on my project concerning economic controversies, appraisal, and history relating to nuclear-sector megaprojects and their framings in Finland, France, Spain, the UK, and... Read More →



Wednesday August 21, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
A-325

16:00 EEST

2E: Intersections of agricultural and environmental histories
Chair: Stéphane Frioux, LARHRA-Université de Lyon

Feeding factory farms: A global environmental history of livestock feed
Floor Haalboom, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society / Erasmus University Rotterdam / Utrecht University

Environmental law, authoritarianism and the expansion of the agricultural frontier in the Brazilian Amazon (1964–1985): Intersections between agrarian history, environmental history and legal history
Santiago Andrade, Federal University of Rondonia

Opening Pandora's box at the roof of the world: Climate, agriculture and disease at the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau
Barbara C. Canavan, Oregon State University

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Stéphane Frioux

Stéphane Frioux

Maītre de conférences, Université Lyon 2
urban environmental historian, specialist of air pollution management in 20th century France. Interested in urban pollution in general, green politics and environmentalism.

Speakers
avatar for Floor Haalboom

Floor Haalboom

researcher and teacher, Erasmus MC Rotterdam
Floor Haalboom is a postdoctoral historian who specializes in the modern environmental history of industrial livestock farming, (veterinary) medicine, One Health, and public health.
avatar for Santiago Andrade

Santiago Andrade

Professor, Universidade Federal de Rondōnia/Universidad Nacional de Colombia
I’m a Professor of Environmental History at the Universidade Federal de Rondônia, Brazil. My postdoctoral research at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia examines the construction of the legal and bureaucratic apparatus for environmental control, classification and hierarchization... Read More →
avatar for Barbara Canavan

Barbara Canavan

Independent scholar
My research examines environment change and its impact on the emergence of infectious disease.



Wednesday August 21, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
M-213

16:00 EEST

2F: Mills and towns: Changing attitudes towards societies and their environments in Medieval Europe
Organizer: Sébastien Rossignol, Memorial University of Newfoundland
Chair: Tim Soens, University of Antwerp

Molendinum and mola in the landscapes of Frankish sources
Corinne Graffin, Memorial University of Newfoundland

Magna fuit fames in mundo: The Great Famine and the environment in Lübeck
Anna Grzybowski, Memorial University of Newfoundland

Urbanization and views on the natural environment in Medieval Silesia
Sébastien Rossignol, Memorial University of Newfoundland

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Tim Soens

Tim Soens

University of Antwerp

Speakers
CG

Corinne Graffin

Graduate Student, Memorial University of Newfoundland
avatar for Anna Grzybowski

Anna Grzybowski

Graduate Student, Memorial University of Newfoundland
SR

Sébastien Rossignol

Assistant Professor, Memorial University, Newfoundland and Labrador



Wednesday August 21, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
A-402

16:00 EEST

2G: Crossing boundaries and using sources in a new manner: War, science and the use of wood between epochs and historiographies in East Central Europe
Organizer: Daniel Marc Segesser, University of Bern
Chair: Małgorzata Praczyk, Adam Mickiewicz University


Forests in the frontier: How Ottoman–Hungarian wars affected the landscape of the Carpathian Basin
András Vadas, Central European University, Budapest

Functions of 1914–1918 war diaries from the war in alpine territory as archives on the relationship between war and the use of natural resources such as wood
Daniel Marc Segesser, University of Bern

Reviewing the place of the Cold War in understanding Nature/Culture boundaries? Biographies, forest management and landscape change in the context of Anthropocene
Róbert Balogh, Hungarian Academy of Sciences

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
MP

Małgorzata Praczyk

Adjunct, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland

Speakers
AV

András Vadas

PhD candidate / assistant professor, Central European University / Eötvös Lorįnd University
avatar for Daniel Marc Segesser

Daniel Marc Segesser

Lecturer & Adjunct Professor, University of Bern
My research focus is on the social, cultural and environmental history of the military as well as on the history of law and politics in the latter 19th and early 20th century. A special focus is the First World War. I am happy to talk about all aspects relating to the environment... Read More →
RB

Róbert Balogh

junior researcher, Institute of History, Centre for the Humanities, Hungarian Academy of Sciences



Wednesday August 21, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
A-121

16:00 EEST

2H: Trade and commodity circulation
Chair: Marco Armiero, KTH Royal Institute of Technology

The invisible hand in the forest: The idea of spontaneous order and the challenge of the long term
Julia Nordblad, Uppsala University

Re-evaluating the “middle ground” paradigm of cross-cultural accommodation in the Upper Mississippi river (Minnesota, USA) region, 1680–1840
Katharine Bjork, Hamline University

Environmental effects of Hansa trade in the Baltic, 1200–1650
Richard W. Unger, University of British Columbia

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
MA

Marco Armiero

Director, Environmental Humanities Laboratory, KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Speakers
JN

Julia Nordblad

docent, associate senior lecturer, Department of History of Science and Ideas, Uppsala University
KB

Katharine Bjork

Professor, Hamline University
RW

Richard W Unger

Professor Emeritus, University of British Columbia



Wednesday August 21, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
S-236

16:00 EEST

2I: Special Session. Environmental history and the boundaries of academia
Facilitators:
Andrea Gaynor, The University of Western Australia
Cordula Scherer, Trinity College Dublin
Sverker Sörlin, KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Margaret Cook, University of Queensland

Session abstract:
This forum will provide an opportunity for sharing experiences of doing environmental history beyond the boundaries of academia, and reflecting on the nature and utility of those boundaries for environmental historians. While most, if not all, environmental histories seek to engage a wider audience, some exercises in environmental history-making are more deliberately public-facing and engaged than others. Sometimes we also bring our expertise or insights as environmental historians to membership of external committees, or to environmental activism. Several countries now have formal mechanisms for assessing academic impact and engagement, yet doubts over the motivations and validity of these exercises remain. There is, however, widespread agreement that increasing social injustice and ecological devastation have lent a new urgency to our work as environmental historians. This panel will begin with a series of short commentaries from five scholars who have taken environmental history beyond the boundaries of academia, followed by an ‘open microphone’ enabling others to share their experiences. We will ask: What are the risks and opportunities of environmental history beyond the boundaries of academia? Who are our key audiences beyond each other? Are there particular scales, audiences, or forms of engagement that are more receptive to environmental historical thinking and messages – or that need it more – than others? Are there trade-offs between activism and academic standing or credibility? And if we look back on environmental history within academia from beyond its boundaries, what are its most urgent and necessary tasks in an age of ecocide? The session will be recorded, and will conclude with a collective summary and agreement on a means of developing and widely circulating discussion outcomes.

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Gaynor

Andrea Gaynor

A/Prof, The University of Western Australia
I'm an environmental historian of Australia, and have diverse research interests, encompassing animal history, urban agriculture, urban water, urban 'nature', agriculture, and more-than-human histories. But really you can talk to me about just about anything.
avatar for Cordula Scherer

Cordula Scherer

Post-doc Researcher, Trinity College Dublin, Centre for Environmental Humanities
marine ecology, ocean productivity of past times, plankton, sustainable seafood
SS

Sverker Sörlin

Professor, Division of History of Science, Technology and Environment, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm
avatar for Margaret Cook

Margaret Cook

Hon. Research Fellow, La Trobe University
Interested in water history and politics, especially floods. My current research project is agricultural history in Queensland, Australia with a focus on gender, water and cotton.



Wednesday August 21, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
A-224

16:00 EEST

2J: Narrating nature: The verbal and visual representations of environment in the Early Modern and Modern Eurasia
Organizer: Alexei Kraikovski, National Research University Higher School of Economics
Chair: David Moon, Nazarbayev University

“Special luck of Her Majesty”: Descriptions and representations of the natural resources in the Early Modern and Modern Russian North
Alexei Kraikovski, National Research University Higher School of Economics
Margarita Dadykina, National Research University Higher School of Economics

The Trans-Siberian ‘landscapes of transportation’ through the lens of travel guidebooks in late Imperial Russia
Alexandra Bekasova, National Research University Higher School of Economics
Ekaterina Kalemeneva, National Research University Higher School of Economics

The Baltic Sea in the works of the Russian and Baltic painters of the 18th–19th centuries: From the victories of the Russian Navy to the comfortable resort
Aleksandra Murre, Kadriorg Art Museum

Comment: David Moon, Nazarbayev University

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for David Moon

David Moon

Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan/University of York, UK
I am currently a visiting professor in the heart of the Eurasian steppe at Nazarbayev University in Nur-Sultan (Astana), Kazakhstan, from my home in the UK. My research has focused on the environmental history of the Eurasian steppes in comparative and transnational contexts. My paper... Read More →

Speakers
AK

Alexei Kraikovski

Associate Professor, National Research University Higher School of Economics, St. Petersburg
avatar for Margarita Dadykina

Margarita Dadykina

Associated Professor, National University Higher School of Economics
AB

Aleksandra Bekasova

Associate Professor, National Research University Higher School of Economics



Wednesday August 21, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
M-340

17:30 EEST

Arcadia Board Meeting

Wednesday August 21, 2019 17:30 - 18:30 EEST
A-354

17:30 EEST

Education Fair (with a coffee break and beehive tours)
Come and exchange teaching methods in environmental history/humanities!
The Education Fair is a new format that addresses our growing teaching needs and experiences. While Environmental History is becoming a popular subject at many universities, we still struggle with the best ways to teach it. We are split between the need to be global and local, constantly weighing between interdisciplinary and disciplinary approaches, and have to be open to new forms of teaching available at our universities.
While we have to make compromises due to the structure of our main curricula, the younger generation ask for clear, but flexible methods and visions and do this in a more and more complicated political and environmental realities.
Facing these growing needs the ESEH conference offers an Education Fair in order to
  • present best, new and experimental practices and interesting projects of how to teach environmental history;
  • discuss your teaching experience with colleagues and learn from them;
  • present ongoing study programs on Environmental History on all levels;
  • strengthen ongoing and new cooperation on how to teach Environmental History; 
  • inspire one another! 
You can participate at the Fair as a Presenter who has prepared some materials to share or as a regular Discussant. We will create 3 Discussion Plazas around the following topics: (1) Methods for active learning; (2) Interdisciplinarity; (3) Case studies of courses, curricula or programs (see below for details). Each Presenter will have 30 min to inform people in their Plaza about your methods, interdisciplinary tricks and courses and to discuss your strategy within your booth area. After 30 minutes the Discussants will be shuffled to a new Plaza and the Presenter gets a new groups to share their ideas.
The Discussion Plazas will be talking about some of the following topics (but not only!)
  1. Methods for active learning 
  • What kind of new formats we can use in teaching environmental history?
  • How can new teaching methods help us to support deeper reflection on different levels (active learning, project-based-learning, co-teaching, outdoor courses). Examples!
  • Can students become researchers? How to involve courses, graduate works and projects in research projects? Examples!
  • how we reflect on the deeper theoretical, political and ethical implications of environmental history in our classes?
2. Interdisciplinarity as a challenge for teaching environmental history
  • How do we teach interdisciplinarity, what does it mean for us?
  • Environmental history relies on a variety of disciplinary methods - which of these do we teach (interdisciplinarity, trans-disciplinarity, trans-human approaches, practical history, other methods coming from close-by disciplines, natural sciences)?
  • What are the best ways of collaborating with other fields / study programmes and with non-academic institutions (NGOs, museums, activists, etc.)?
3. Case studies of courses, programs and curricula etc.
  • How have you managed to set up courses? What should we teach?
  • How do we design our classes/programs in order to bring together local and global, past and future, large and small scale problems?
  • How can we link academia with “real life” issues? What is the practical value of our courses/programs/classes? How to achieve real outcome?
  • What are the readings and assessment methods that work best?
  • How to fit environmental history in the rigid Intended Learning Outcomes of traditional curricula?

In addition, those who so wish are welcome to visit Tallinn University’s beehives that are a part of Tallinn University’s project-based learning program LIFE. Rooftop tours led by Liisa Puusepp (she has a bee on her shirt!) leave from Astra ping-pong-table  at 18.00 and 18.30 and take maximum 15 persons.
The first to arrive gets to go!

Speakers
avatar for Ulrike Plath

Ulrike Plath

Professor for Baltic German Studies and Environmental History, Tallinn University
Enjoy the conference!!!!
avatar for Kati Lindström

Kati Lindström

KTH Royal Institute of Technology / KAJAK
I am the ESEH Regional Representative for the Baltic States - come and join our BALTEHUMS lunch on August 21 if you are interested in the Baltic environmental humanities and social sciences.
LP

Liisa Puusepp

Tallinn University / Estonian Ministry of Environment



Wednesday August 21, 2019 17:30 - 19:00 EEST
Mare Atrium, 3rd floor

17:30 EEST

Side event: Environmental History Editor's Hour
Want to know what it takes to publish in Environmental History? Swing by the Astra Forum April 21 from 5:30-9:00 PM to speak with the editor!

Speakers
SB

Stephen Brain

Associate Professor, Mississippi State University



Wednesday August 21, 2019 17:30 - 19:00 EEST
Researchers' Forum in Astra Building

18:15 EEST

Social event: Nordic ESEH open mingle
This is an open informal meeting of all colleagues interested in the whereabouts of Nordic environmental history. 
We will use the opportunity to meet new colleagues and introduce ourselves, and if you wish to use a few minutes to introduce some specific initiatives, projects etc. you are welcome to do so. We have arranged the possibility to show some ppt-slides (please keep them to 1-2 summarizing slides with links and/or contact details – no “presentations” possible!)
Feel free also to bring some new books etc for show, anything that might be of interest to our group!

Speakers
PS

Paula Schönach

University of Helsinki



Wednesday August 21, 2019 18:15 - 19:15 EEST
A-346

20:00 EEST

Welcome reception at Lennusadam (Seaplane Harbour)
Pre-reception:
19:30-20:00: Guided tours through the Seaplane Harbour Museum
19:30-21:00: Gift shop is open throughout the reception

Reception:
20:00-20:15 Welcome and speeches
21:00-21:20 Concert
23.00 End of the Reception
Food and drinks will be served throughout the reception.

How to get to the Seaplane Harbour Museum?
  • Take tramway 1 from “Tallinn University” to “Linnahall” (direction Kopli, 18:40; 18:49; 18:58; 19:08). From “Linnahall” take bus 73 (direction Tööstuse) to “Lennusadam” (18:47; 19:12; 19:37) or walk from 15 minutes to the museum. Maps are available at the reception desk. 
  • To walk all the way from University to the Museum will take about 40 minutes!
  • Join the guided walking tours from University to the Museum! Our volunteers will give you some insider information about the town during your walk. 
Guided tour 1: 18:40 (Meeting Point entrance Mare building, Uus-Sadama 5)
Guided tour 2: 18:50 (Meeting Point entrance Mare building, Uus-Sadama 5)
Guided tour 3: 19:00 (Meeting Point entrance Mare building, Uus-Sadama 5)

How to get back to the City Center?
  • take bus 73 (direction Veerenni 22:20; 22:44; 23:09; 23:34) to City Center. 
  • Walk ca 30 minutes

Wednesday August 21, 2019 20:00 - 23:00 EEST
Seaplane Harbour Lennusadam
 
Thursday, August 22
 

09:00 EEST

3A: Responding to water pollution across borders
Organizer: Yaël Gagnepain, Université de Lille / Université de Namur
Chair: Charles François Mathis, Université de Bordeaux

Dirty habits across borders: Boundaries, pollution and public health in late Victorian England and Wales
Keir Waddington, Cardiff University

Transnational river and pollution issue
Yaël Gagnepain, Université de Lille / Université de Namur

The legal protection of the North Sea against oil pollution: A reactive process
Stephan Hauser, Delft University of Technology

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
CM

Charles-Francois Mathis

Senior Lecturer, Université Bordeaux Montaigne
I'm working on a cultural and material history of coal in Britain from the 1840s to 1940, trying to figure out how people conceived and lived with such a dirty and exhaustible energy. Contact: cfmathis@hotmail.com

Speakers
avatar for Keir Waddington

Keir Waddington

Professor of History, Cardiff University
Social historian of Victorian medicine, also works on environmental history, literature and science, and interdisciplinarity. Partial to cake and gin. A firm believer in all things European and despairs of leaving EU.
YG

Yael Gagnepain

PhD Student, University of Lille
I'm working on industrial pollution issues in France and Belgium. My presentation on Thursday will be about the economical and environmental impact of a canal built between the two countries during the XIXth century.
avatar for Stephan Hauser

Stephan Hauser

PhD, TU Delft, Faculty of architecture
I'm working in the faculty of architecture at TU Delft, but have a legal background in town planning, construction, and environment. My topic is focusing on the influence of the oil industry and actors in the creation or application of regulations. But feel free to talk with me about... Read More →



Thursday August 22, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
S-240

09:00 EEST

3B: Bordering the Little Ice Age and its human consequences: Spatial, temporal and conceptual aspects. Part I: Sources at the borders between humanities and natural sciences
Organizers: Christian Rohr, University of Bern
Heli Huhtamaa, Heidelberg University
Chantal Camenish, University of York
Chair: Lukas Heinzmann, University of Bern

The Little Ice Age in Europe and its influence on food systems on agricultural margins
Heli Huhtamaa, Heidelberg University

Euro-Climhist, a database project to bridge boundaries in space and research disciplines
Tamara T. Widmer, University of Bern

In search for “new” storms and strong winds in Baltics from the mid of the 19th century
Kaarel Vanamölder, Tallinn University
Krister Kruusmaa, Tallinn University

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
LH

Lukas Heinzmann

Ph.D. student, University of Bern

Speakers
avatar for Krister Kruusmaa

Krister Kruusmaa

Junior Researcher, Tallinn University
HH

Heli Huhtamaa

Post doc, Heidelberg University
TT

Tamara T. Widmer

Assistant, University of Bern
avatar for Kaarel Vanamölder

Kaarel Vanamölder

Associate Professor / Research Fellow, Tallinn University



Thursday August 22, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
M-225

09:00 EEST

3C: Ecological thought
Chair: Leona Skelton, Northumbria University

A century of Chinese perceptions on the relationship between humans and nature
Rune Svarverud, University of Oslo

Boundaries of co-evolution, exemplified by the Baltic German naturalists Karl Ernst von Baer, Max von Sivers and Jakob von Uexküll
Timo Assmuth, Finnish Environment Institute

The water reservoirs and the Lysenkoism: The boundaries between a science, an ideology, and a practice of resource use
Alexandra Rizhinashvili, St.Petersburg Branch of S.I. Vavilov Institute for the History of Science and Technology of the RAS

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
LS

Leona Skelton

Senior Lecturer, Northumbria University

Speakers
RS

Rune Svarverud

Professor, University of Oslo
TA

Timo Assmuth

Docent, Senior researcher
Historiography and history of ideasEnvironmental humanities including artsEnvironmental and natural resources risks (also in historical perspective)Baltica and Judaica
AR

Alexandra Rizhinashvili

senior researcher, St.Petersburg Branch of S.I. Vavilov Institute for the History of Science and Technology of the RAS



Thursday August 22, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
S-238

09:00 EEST

3D: Special session. Open discussion forum: Translating energy history in times of transition
Facilitators:
Ute Hasenöhrl, University of Innsbruck
Odinn Melsted, University of Innsbruck
Karena Kalmbach, Eindhoven University of Technology
Patrick Kupper, University of Innsbruck
Timothy Moss, Humboldt University of Berlin
Andrew Watson, University of Saskatchewan
Verena Winiwarter, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU)

Session abstract:
In recent years, historians of energy have increasingly related their work to contemporary discussions about energy transition and formulated “insights from history” or “lessons from the past” for the future decarbonisation of society. While this research has vastly increased our knowledge on past processes, structures, actors, and dynamics of energy production and consumption – and at least attempted to introduce this vital information into public debate –, there has been little systematic discussion on how historians should best engage in these topical debates. How can historians go beyond academia, to inform (or even influence) experts, policymakers, education, and the general public? Is energy history even “useful“ for informing contemporary transitions, and how can it be communicated? Are (energy) historians qualified to formulate practical lessons from the past, and what is the particular added value of historical research compared to, for example, transition studies from the social and natural sciences? And, last but not least, does energy history need to be useful at all – or do we risk reducing our research agendas by focusing primarily on what appears to be relevant or desirable today?
In this open discussion forum, historians of energy and practitioners from the field are invited to scrutinize the relevance of energy history in times of transition. Renowned historians of energy and the environment will give short statements, sharing and critically evaluating their experiences in relating their research to contemporary challenges, working inter- and transdisciplinary, as well as in policy informing and science to public activities. The forum will also be confronted with statements from recorded interviews with practitioners from energy politics, utilities and citizens’ initiatives. In doing so, this session aims to explore both the potentials and boundaries of energy history in going beyond historiography and engaging with other disciplines, stakeholders and the general public. All ESEH delegates interested in this debate – as well as local stakeholders from Tallinn – are invited to join and contribute to the discussion.

Speakers
UH

Ute Hasenöhrl

University of Innsbruck
avatar for Odinn Melsted

Odinn Melsted

PhD student, University of Innsbruck
I grew up in Iceland and Austria and am currently working on my PhD project about energy transitions in Iceland since the 1940s and their transnational context, i.e. how Iceland became a country that receives all heating and electricity from renewable geothermal energy and hydropower... Read More →
KK

Karena Kalmbach

Assistant Professor, TU Eindhoven
PK

Patrick Kupper

University of Innsbruck
TM

Timothy Moss

Senior Researcher, IRI THESys, Humboldt University of Berlin
AW

Andrew Watson

Assistant Professor, University of Saskatchewan
VW

Verena Winiwarter

Professor for Environmental History, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences



Thursday August 22, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
A-325

09:00 EEST

3E: Eating boundaries: Cultural practices of food between body, culture and environment
Organizer: Alwin Cubasch, University of Innsbruck
Chair: Robert Groß, University of Innsbruck / BOKU

Tales of dairy-do: Milk and the habitus of the medieval Icelandic people
Bethany Rogers, University of Iceland

Symbolic and multi-territorial connections of sugar: The case of fanid
Amanda Geraldes, Universidade de Évora / Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais

Food beyond nature: Eating in technological environments of the Space Age
Alwin Cubasch, University of Innsbruck

The body and the production–expert–consumer chain in the discourse of dietary advice during high modernity in Poland.
Anna Węgiel, Polish Academy of Sciences

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Robert Groß

Robert Groß

University Assistant, BOKU Institute of Social Ecology/Innsbruck University, Institute of History and European Ethnology

Speakers
avatar for Bethany Rogers

Bethany Rogers

University of Iceland
avatar for Amanda Geraldes

Amanda Geraldes

PhD Student, Universidade de Évora
AC

Alwin Cubasch

University Assistant, University of Innsbruck
AW

Anna Węgiel

PhD student, Institute of Philosophy and Sociology, Polish Academy of Sciences



Thursday August 22, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
M-213

09:00 EEST

3F: Istanbul’s urban history unbound: Emergent environmental approaches
Organizers: Özlem Altınkaya-Genel, Ozyegin University
Mehmet Kentel, Istanbul Research Institute
Chair: Shirine Hamadeh, Koc University

Rivers and orchards of Kasımpaşa: Exploring Pera’s excremental hinterland in Late Ottoman Istanbul
Mehmet Kentel, Istanbul Research Institute

Shifting trajectories of animal life in Istanbul
Sezai Ozan Zeybek, Forum Transregionale Studien

Produce farming on Istanbul’s shores in the Early Modern period
Aleksandar Shopov, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
SH

Shirine Hamadeh

Associate Professor, Koē University Istanbul

Speakers
KM

Koca Mehmet Kentel

Research Projects Manager, Istanbul Research Institute
avatar for Sezai Ozan Zeybek

Sezai Ozan Zeybek

Associate Professor, Forum Transregionale Studien
AS

Aleksandar Shopov

Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society



Thursday August 22, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
A-402

09:00 EEST

3G: “Hard science” and “hard numbers” in environmental history: Interdisciplinary study of natural and human archives. Part I
Organizer: Adam Izdebski, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History / Jagiellonian University in Krakow
Chair: Péter Szabó, Institute of Botany, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic

The natural archives in the historical narrative: Potentialities and limits
Alessia Masi, Sapienza University
Adam Izdebski, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History / Jagiellonian University in Krakow

Regional variations in European building activity during times of crisis
Fredrik Charpentier Ljungqvist, Stockholm University

Exploring the synergy of quantitative and environmental history: A study of the North-Western Peloponnese in the light of Ottoman taxation cadastres and sediment cores
Georgios Liakopoulos, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History

Abstract available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Péter Szabó

Péter Szabó

Institute of Botany of the Czech Academy of Sciences

Speakers
AI

Adam Izdebski

Independent Research Group Leader, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History
Also: Jagiellonian University in Kraków
avatar for Alessia Masi

Alessia Masi

Guest Researcher, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History - Jena (Germany) and Sapienza University of Rome (Italy)
I'm specialized in palynological and archaeobotanical researches of mediterranean sites mainly located in Italy, Turkey and Balkans peninsula. I was among the first scientists interested in the use of stable isotopes in archaeobotany to infer paleoclimate and cultivation practices... Read More →
FC

Fredrik Charpentier Ljungqvist

Associate Professor, Stockholm Univeristy
avatar for Georgios Liakopoulos

Georgios Liakopoulos

Senior Postdoctoral Rsearcher, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History
I was born in Athens, Greece. I studied History at the University of Athens (BA, 1999) and Ottoman History at Bilkent University in Ankara, Turkey (MA, 2002). In 2009 I obtained a Ph.D. in Ottoman History from Royal Holloway, University of London, UK. I am fluent in Greek (native... Read More →



Thursday August 22, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
A-121

09:00 EEST

3H: Constructions of remote resource spaces: Africa, the Arctic and the quest for resource security in Europe
Organizer: Matthias Heymann, Aarhus University
Chair: Matthias Heymann, Aarhus University

From euphoria to zero tolerance: The history of the Kvanefjeld uranium deposit in Greenland
Henrik Knudsen, Danish National Archive

Gold fever in Greenland: Sociotechnical imaginaries of gold resources, 1988–2013
Kristian Hvidtfelt Nielsen, Aarhus University

France’s neo-colonial resource entanglements in Africa: Perspectives on uranium extraction in Mali and Niger
Nkemjika Chimee Ihediwa, University of Nigeria

SYSMIN interventions in Southern Africa: Developing minerals and maintaining mines as development aid
Bjørn Bakke, Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
MH

Matthias Heymann

Aarhus University

Speakers
HK

Henrik Knudsen

Archivist, Danish National Archive
avatar for Nkemjika Chimee Ihediwa

Nkemjika Chimee Ihediwa

Doctoral candidate, University of Nigeria, Nsukka Nigeria
I am Ihediwa Nkemjika Chimee, a doctoral candidate (Abd) and a lecturer in the Department of History & International Studies, University of Nigeria, Nsukka Nigeria. I am also an Attorney and a member of the Nigerian Bar Association. My research interests are in the domain of political... Read More →
BL

Bjørn Lien Bakke

Norwegian University of Science and Technology



Thursday August 22, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
S-236

09:00 EEST

3I: The environmental effects of administrative boundaries and borders
Chair: Borna Fuerst-Bjeliš, University of Zagreb

Environmental heritage, resources and administrative boundaries during Modern Age
Elina Gugliuzzo, University Pegaso Naples
Giuseppe Restifo, independent scholar

Discussing borders in an environmental perspective: Southern Mozambique in the late 19th century and present day challenges
Ana Cristina Roque, University of Lisbon

Văcărești Natural Park: Re-drawing boundaries of socialist ruins and middle class urban nature
Calin Cotoi, University of Bucharest

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Borna Fuerst-Bjeliš

Borna Fuerst-Bjeliš

Full professor, University of Zagreb, Faculty of Science, Department of Geography
Professor of Environmental History and Mediterranean Studies at University of Zagreb. Main research interest in environmental and land use change in Mediterranean karst.

Speakers
avatar for Calin Cotoi

Calin Cotoi

Professor, University of Bucharest
EG

Elina Gugliuzzo

Researcher, University Pegaso Naples
GR

giuseppe restifo

independent scholar, University of Messina



Thursday August 22, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
A-224

09:00 EEST

3J: Extending the physical and conceptual boundaries of ghost acres
Organizer: Stephane Castonguay, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières
Chair: Nancy Shoemaker, University of Connecticut

From ghost hectares to real hectares: Exploring the spatial boundaries of forest exploitation in the Southern Baltic hinterland (1600–1850)
Jawad Daheur, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique

Ghost acres, interconnected synchronicities and landscape changes in the forest and urban environments of the British Empire during the long 19th century
Jim Clifford, University of Saskatchewan
Stéphane Castonguay, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières

Toxic commons: Ghost acres and the global waste economy
Simone M. Müller, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
NS

Nancy Shoemaker

Professor of History, University of Connecticut

Speakers
JC

Jim Clifford

Associate Professor, University of Saskatchewan
avatar for Stéphane Castonguay

Stéphane Castonguay

Professor, Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres
avatar for Simone Müller

Simone Müller

Project Director, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society



Thursday August 22, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
M-340

09:00 EEST

3K: Nordic adventure landscapes: Invention and reinvention of a nature tradition and their environmental potentials
Organizer: Karen Lykke Syse, University of Oslo
Chair: Karen Lykke Syse, University of Oslo

Understanding the nature of the native: A quest for authenticity in Norwegian landscapes
Karen Lykke Syse, University of Oslo

Practices of sharing economy and environmentalism within the Norwegian Trekking Association cabin system
Karina Standal, Cicero – Center for International Climate Research
Hege Westskog, Cicero – Center for International Climate Research

Making place for the future: The transformation of Viared from rural village to industrial area after 1972
Daniel Svensson, Chalmers University of Technology

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Karen Lykke Syse

Karen Lykke Syse

Associate Professor, Centre for Development and the Environment, University of Oslo

Speakers
HW

Hege Westskog

Senior Researcher, CICERO - Center for Climate Research
avatar for Daniel Svensson

Daniel Svensson

Postdoc, Chalmers University of Technology
Daniel Svensson holds a PhD in history and is currently a researcher and lecturer at the Division of Science, Technology and Society, Chalmers University of Technology. His research deals with the scientization of training methods in endurance sports (i.e. cross-country skiing), and... Read More →



Thursday August 22, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
A-346

10:30 EEST

Coffee break
Coffee breaks are served in two places: Mare Atrium and Astra Researcher's Forum.
You can also grab your coffee and go to see what the ICEHO is up to in room A-354.


Thursday August 22, 2019 10:30 - 11:00 EEST
Mare Atrium, 3rd floor / Researchers' Forum in Astra Building

10:30 EEST

ICEHO Coffee break
ICEHO coffee break in room A-354. Grab your coffee and come to learn more about the tremendous work of the International Consortium of Environmental History Organizations!

Speakers
VW

Verena Winiwarter

Professor for Environmental History, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences



Thursday August 22, 2019 10:30 - 11:00 EEST
A-354

11:00 EEST

4A: Water infrastructure history across borders
Organizer: Julia Obertreis, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg
Chair: Christoph Bernhardt, Leibniz Institute for Research on Society and Space

Juxtaposed systems: The boundary work of infrastructure in Berlin
Timothy Moss, IRI THESys, Humboldt University of Berlin

Water infrastructures in St. Petersburg/ Leningrad in the long 20th century
Olga Malinova-Tziafeta, Alexander-Friedrich-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

Urban water infrastructure in the 20th century in Europe East and West
Julia Obertreis, Alexander-Friedrich-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

Comment: Christoph Bernhardt, Leibniz Institute for Research on Society and Space

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
CB

Christoph Bernhardt

Head of Department, Leibniz-Institute for Research on Society and Space

Speakers
TM

Timothy Moss

Senior Researcher, IRI THESys, Humboldt University of Berlin
OM

Olga Malinova-Tziafeta

research fellow, FAU Erlangen/Nuremberg
JO

Julia Obertreis

Professor, University Erlangen-Nuremberg



Thursday August 22, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
S-240

11:00 EEST

4B: Bordering the Little Ice Age and its human consequences: Spatial, temporal and conceptual aspects. Part II: The Baltic Sea region in a long-term perspective
Organizers: Christian Rohr, University of Bern
Heli Huhtamaa, Heidelberg University
Chantal Camenish, University of York
Chair: Heli Huhtamaa, Heidelberg University

Tracking climate-driven pan-regional crises on the eastern shore of the Baltic Sea region: 13th–17th centuries
Priit Raudkivi, Tallinn University

Hard work and technological changes defeat climate change: Agricultural development in Sweden in the face of deteriorating climate 1570–1870
Lotta Leijonhufvud, Gothenburg University

From the Little Ice Age to modern warming in southwest Finland
Stefan Norrgård, Åbo Akademi University

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
HH

Heli Huhtamaa

Post doc, Heidelberg University

Speakers
PR

Priit Raudkivi

senior researcher, Tallinn University
avatar for Lotta Leijonhufvud

Lotta Leijonhufvud

University of Gothenburg
It's always pleasant to talk about the weather on social occasions.
SN

Stefan Norrgård

Åbo Akademi University



Thursday August 22, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
M-225

11:00 EEST

4C: Environmental history as the politics and tools of timing: Nature-times, calendar-times and political times
Organizer: May-Brith Ohman Nielsen, University of Agder
Chair: Kristin Asdal, University of Oslo

Timing predators
May-Brith Ohman Nielsen, University of Agder
Anne Mette Seines, University of Agder

Timing fish
Kristin Asdal, University of Oslo

Timing bees
Anne Jorunn Frøyen, Jærmuseet

Timing rats
Anne Mette Seines, University of Agder
May-Brith Ohman Nielsen, University of Agder

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
KA

Kristin Asdal

Professor, TIK, University of Oslo

Speakers
MO

May-Brith Ohman Nielsen

Professor, University of Agder
avatar for Anne Mette Seines

Anne Mette Seines

PhD Research Fellow, University of Agder
My research project is called Poison in Scandinavia and I study the poisons bought by private citizens from pharmacies from 1800-1970. Following this pest control is a large part of my research. I also struggle/enjoy gothic handwriting...
AJ

Anne Jorunn Frøyen

PHD-student, University of Agder/Jaermuseet



Thursday August 22, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
S-238

11:00 EEST

4D: Energies at home: Transgressing or reinforcing gender boundaries?
Organizer: Charles-Francois Mathis, University Bordeaux Montaigne
Chair: Timo Myllyntaus, Turku School of Economics

Progressive reform, female expertise, and the moulding of American energy consumption
Rebecca Wright, Northumbria University

Women, domesticity and the British Coal Utilisation Council in the 1930s
Charles-Francois Mathis, Bordeaux Montaigne University

Forest crisis, rural energy reform and women’s groups: A gender perspective to the household energy transition in post-WWII Japan
Hiroki Shin, Science Museum London / Birkbeck College

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Timo Myllyntaus

Timo Myllyntaus

Professor of Economic and Social History, Turku School of Economics
Here at this ESEH conference, I organise a session on famines in the Baltic and Nordic countries.

Speakers
RW

Rebecca Wright

Lecturer, Northumbria University
CM

Charles-Francois Mathis

Senior Lecturer, Université Bordeaux Montaigne
I'm working on a cultural and material history of coal in Britain from the 1840s to 1940, trying to figure out how people conceived and lived with such a dirty and exhaustible energy. Contact: cfmathis@hotmail.com
HS

Hiroki Shin

Research Fellow, Science Museum London



Thursday August 22, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
A-325

11:00 EEST

4E: Border ecologies: Cross-border perspective on protected area
Organizer: Csaba Mészáros, Hungarian Academy of Sciences
Chair: Jurij Fikfak, Research Centre of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts

How to understand Anthropocene in peripheral communities?
Csaba Mészáros, Hungarian Academy of Sciences

Different preferences of conservationists and local farmers regarding protected species with conservational significance in a high nature value borderland region
Viktor Ulicsni, Hungarian Academy of Sciences
Zsolt Molnár, Hungarian Academy of Sciences
Dániel Babai, Hungarian Academy of Sciences

Wildlife: Heritage and burden of the Iron Curtain
Miha Kozorog, Research Centre of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
JF

Jurij Fikfak

Researcher, ZRC SAZU

Speakers
VU

Viktor Ulicsni

research fellow, MTA Centre for Ecological Research, Hungary



Thursday August 22, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
M-213

11:00 EEST

4F: Urban natures
Chair: Petra J.E.M. van Dam, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Spectacle: A history of Boston's urban islands
Pavla Šimková, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich / Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society

Detroit: Reconfiguring borderlands at intersections of the natural and built environment
Elena Torres Ruiz, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society

From oil to hipsters: The nature of gentrification in Venice, USA
Elsa Devienne, Université Paris Nanterre / Northumbria University

Suburban naturecultures: Inhabited and built suburban environments
Kirsi Saarikangas, University of Helsinki

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Petra J. E. M. van Dam

Petra J. E. M. van Dam

prof. dr., Free University Amsterdam
I focus on the environmental, social-economic, political and cultural aspects of the relationships between humans, animals, water, and landscape in the past. With my historical projects I want to promote environmental awareness and contribute to the transition to a more sustainable... Read More →

Speakers
PS

Pavla Šimková

Rachel Carson Center, LMU Munich
avatar for Elena Torres Ruiz

Elena Torres Ruiz

Doctoral Candidate, Rachel Carson Center
avatar for Elsa Devienne

Elsa Devienne

Assistant Professor, Northumbria University/Université Paris Nanterre
Starting this September, I will be lecturer in US history at Northumbria University (UK). My research lies at the intersection of urban history, environmental history, and the history of gender, body and sexuality, with a focus on the 20th century. I am particularly interested in... Read More →
avatar for Kirsi Saarikangas

Kirsi Saarikangas

Professor of Art History, University of Helsinki



Thursday August 22, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
A-402

11:00 EEST

4G: “Hard science” and “hard numbers” in environmental history: Interdisciplinary study of natural and human archives. Part II
Organizer: Adam Izdebski, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History / Jagiellonian University in Krakow
Chair: Péter Szabó, Institute of Botany, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic

Environment and demography in pre-industrial times: The case of Poland-Lithuania
Marzena Liedke, University of Białystok
Piotr Guzowski, University of Białystok
Radosław Poniat, University of Białystok
Cezary Kuklo, University of Białystok

Between numbers and narratives: Communicating interdisciplinary environmental history to different academic audiences and the public
Rafał Szmytka, Jagiellonian University in Krakow
Adam Izdebski, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History / Jagiellonian University in Krakow

Turning points in Medieval and Early Modern Polish agriculture in the light of historical and environmental sources: The case of Greater Poland
Piotr Guzowski, University of Białystok

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Péter Szabó

Péter Szabó

Institute of Botany of the Czech Academy of Sciences

Speakers
PG

Piotr Guzowski

dr, University of Bialystok
ML

Marzena Liedke

professor, University of Bialystok
RP

Radosław Poniat

assistant professor, University of Bialystok
RS

Rafał Szmytka

assistant professor, Jagiellonian University
AI

Adam Izdebski

Independent Research Group Leader, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History
Also: Jagiellonian University in Kraków



Thursday August 22, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
A-121

11:00 EEST

4H: Roundtable. Thinking about capitalism in Mediterranean environmental history
Organizer: Mark Stoll, Texas Tech University

Roberta Biasillo, KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Mark Stoll, Texas Tech University
Manuel González de Molina, Universidad Pablo de Olavide
Stefania Barca, University of Coimbra
Marco Armiero, KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Abstract:
In George Perkins Marsh’s conservation classic Man and Nature of 1864, centuries of environmental change in the Mediterranean provided his key evidence. Yet even though the roots of modern capitalism lie in the medieval Mediterranean, economic systems played no part in Marsh’s analysis. 
Today, a wave of new monographs focuses on the environmental history of capitalism, although none has looked specifically at the Mediterranean as a region. No ESEH panel seems to have directly addressed the capitalism’s impact on the area. 
This roundtable brings together historians from across the Mediterranean region for a discussion of the historical impact of capitalism on the Mediterranean environment. Each brings expertise in different subfields of environmental history in an effort to bring the Mediterranean out of the historiographical shadows and shine a spotlight on it. 
The panel considers the subject from a variety of perspectives. How did the rise of merchant capitalism in the medieval Italian maritime republics affect the Mediterranean environment and prepare the ground for plantation and industrial capitalism? What have been the benefits and environmental impacts of the industrialization of Spanish agriculture? What environmental and social costs were paid so that nineteenth-century industrial capitalism could reach into Italian mountain watersheds to slake their growing thirst for energy? How does the Vajont dam disaster (1963, 2000 killed) suggest a historical political ecology of capitalist appropriation of mountains? How did Greece organize its energy sector on anti-capitalist principles? The panel’s goal is to bring these and other questions into dynamic conversation.


Speakers
avatar for Mark Stoll

Mark Stoll

Professor, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas, USA
Author of Inherit the Holy Mountain: Religion and the Rise of American Environmentalism (OUP, 2015). Writing an environmental history of capitalism.
RB

Roberta Biasillo

KTH Environmental Humanities Laboratory, Stockholm
MG

Manuel González de Molina

Full Professor, Universidad Pablo de Olavide
SB

Stefania Barca

Center for Social Studies - University of Coimbra
MA

Marco Armiero

Director, Environmental Humanities Laboratory, KTH Royal Institute of Technology



Thursday August 22, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
S-236

11:00 EEST

4I: The environment in European politics
Chair: Astrid M. Eckert, Emory University

From human–nature companionship to consumer rights: A conceptual analysis of the changing perception of human nature in Finnish and German green parties in the 1990’s
Risto-Matti Matero, University of Jyväskylä

From local to global: Boundaries in green political thinking
Jenni Karimäki, University of Turku

Industrial pollution, technology and legislation (France, 1800–1850)
Thomas Le Roux, French National Center for Scientific Research

Nature as a boundary to the coal industry: The transnational management of mining accidents, European integration, and the case of Marcinelle (1950s–1970s)
Siegfried Evens, KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
AM

Astrid M. Eckert

Associate Professor, Emory University

Speakers
TL

Thomas Le Roux

Centre de Recherches Historiques (EHESS/CNRS)
RM

Risto-Matti Matero

PhD Student, University of Jyväskylä
avatar for Jenni Karimäki

Jenni Karimäki

University of Turku
avatar for Siegfried Evens

Siegfried Evens

PhD Candidate
I am a political historian, specialised in the history of risk and disaster. My broader research interests relate to risk studies, disaster studies, international and transnational history, European integration, Belgian political history, fire safety, mining history, and last but... Read More →



Thursday August 22, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
A-224

11:00 EEST

4J: Negotiating the boundaries of environmental history: Ideology vs matter
Organizer: Claudio de Majo, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society
Chair: Monica Vasile, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society

Ideological matter or material ideologies? An introduction
Claudio de Majo, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society

Spatiotemporal perspectivism and ideological affordances: An ecumenical approach to environmental history
Jonatan Palmblad, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society

The Anthropocene in its early scientific phase (2000–2009): Objects and objectives
Eugenio Luciano, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society

Comment: Jeroen Oomen, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society / Deutsches Museum

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Monica Vasile

Monica Vasile

visiting scholar, Rachel Carson Center

Speakers
CD

Claudio de Majo

Doctoral Candidate, Rachel Carson Center
JP

Jonatan Palmblad

Rachel Carson Center
avatar for Eugenio Luciano

Eugenio Luciano

PhD Candidate, Rachel Carson Center, LMU Munich
BA in Philosophy, MA in Environment and Natural Resources, working on the Anthropocene in its early scientific phase (2000-2009)
JO

Jeroen Oomen

Utrecht University



Thursday August 22, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
M-340

11:00 EEST

4K: Recreation in nature
Chair: Finn Arne Jørgensen, University of Stavanger

From parks to trails: Bicycle–human–landscape ensembles since the 19th century
Ben Anderson, Keele University

“Be at Home in the Open”: Nature, norms, and nation in the British Girl Guides
Pollyanna Rhee, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

“A Wealth of Romance”: Writing on and about Green Island, 1930–1960
Jayne Regan, Australian National University

Mimetic dimensions of bird–human interactions: The use of bird sound imitations and playbacks in birding
Riin Magnus, University of Tartu
Sugata Bhattacharya, University of Tartu

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Finn Arne Jørgensen

Finn Arne Jørgensen

Professor of Environmental History, University of Stavanger
I'm the chair of the program committee for ESEH 2019.

Speakers
BA

Ben Anderson

Lecturer, Keele University
PR

Pollyanna Rhee

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
JR

Jayne Regan

Australian National University
RM

Riin Magnus

University of Tartu
Human-animal interactions, urban nature, semiotics, environmental philosophy, trees



Thursday August 22, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
A-346

12:30 EEST

Lunch
Warm lunch is served in two places: Mare Atrium and Astra Researchers' Forum.


Thursday August 22, 2019 12:30 - 14:00 EEST
Mare Atrium, 3rd floor / Researchers' Forum in Astra Building

13:00 EEST

ClimHist Baltic Module meeting
Thursday August 22, 2019 13:00 - 14:00 EEST
M-417

13:00 EEST

World Café preparation

Thursday August 22, 2019 13:00 - 16:00 EEST
A-354

14:00 EEST

Poster Session
Chair: Joonas Plaan, Tallinn University

Cultural landscapes on periphery, their protection and regional distribution in the Czech Republic
Markéta Šantrůčková, Silva Tarouca Research Institute for Landscape and Ornamental Gardening

Olive trees’ survival ability in an arid desert environment without irrigation in the Negev Highlands of Southern Israel
Eli Ashkenazi, Beit Berl College
Yona Chen, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Yoav Avni, Geological Survey of Israel

Environmental images of the borderlands: Evidence from the Early Modern Croatia
Borna Fuerst-Bjeliš, University of Zagreb

Agriculture – Water management – Climate change: Communicating science to politics
Agnes Limmer, Technical University Munich-,IAS

The development of the cultural environment in rural Latvia, 20th–21th century: Case study of Tirza Village
Zenija Kruzmetra, Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies
Dina Bite, Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies
Margarita Barzdevica, Riga Music Secondary School
Jazeps Medins, Riga Music Secondary School

Traditional vine agroforestry as a sustainable agricultural strategy. The case of the arbustum and the alberata in Italy
Dimitri Van Limbergen, Ghent University

Historical evolution of the forest cover loss in the Amoron’i Mania region, central highlands of Madagascar, the case of Ambositra I and II
Randriamifidison Rindramampionona Fanambinantsoa Ankasitrahana, Institut Supérieur de Technologie Ambositra Madagascar
Tsaralaza Jorlin Tsiavahananahary, University of Mahajanga Madagascar

Extinct settlements: The space without frontier
Nina Schläfli, University of Bern

Transformation of the Sheksna riverbed in the Russian Empire and USSR: Between industrial development and ecosystem disturbance, 1890–1940s
Anna Agafonova, Cherepovets State University

Hofstad: A living lab for participatory research on urban agriculture and urban food production in the past (Antwerp, Belgium)
Tim Soens, University of Antwerp

Making risks in environmental history visible: The “risk spirals” of the spa- and ski-tourism community Bad Hofgastein (Austria) in the 20th century
Clara Gassner-Schneckenleithner, independent scholar

For a partial transboundaries building of the contemporary environmental history of Riga Gulf
Anatole Danto, CNRS
Mare Mätas, SA Kihnu Kultuuriruum

Land and faith? No, fish and wax: Military and political history of the Pskov–Livonian borderland as the struggle for natural resources
Elena Salmina, Archaeological Center of Pskov Region
Sergey Salmin, Pskov Archaeological Center / Archaeological Center of Pskov Region

Moving boundaries of responsibility: The International Society against Water, Soil and Air Pollution estd. 1877
Ulrich Koppitz, Medical History Library, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf

The revolution actually was televised: Environmental politics and the antinuclear movement’s challenge to free enterprise from New England to West Germany during the 1970s
David Smith, University of Dallas

Moderators
Speakers
AL

Agnes Limmer

Program Manager, Technical University Munich
avatar for Randriamifidison Rindramampionona Fanambinantsoa Ankasitrahana

Randriamifidison Rindramampionona Fanambinantsoa Ankasitrahana

Lecturer, Institut Superieur de Technologie Ambositra
Working in Research and Higher Education in Madagascar. I work in Biodiversity conservation considering community participations, climate change adaptation, ecosystem evolution, forest restoration model and sustainable development policies
DS

David Smith

Assistant Professor, University of Dallas
SS

Sergey Salmin

Pskov Archaeological Center, Archaeological Center of Pskov Region
EA

Eli Ashkenazi

Lecturer, Beit Berl College, Israel; and Oranim College, Israel
DV

Dimitri Van Limbergen

Postdoctoral Research Assistant, Ghent University
avatar for Tim Soens

Tim Soens

University of Antwerp
ES

Elena Salmina

Researcher, Archaeologist, PhD, Archaeological Center of Pskov Region
CG

Clara Gassner-Schneckenleithner

Graduate student, University of Klagenfurt
UK

Ulrich Koppitz

Librarian, Univ. Dusseldorf
eseh treasurer
avatar for Anna Agafonova

Anna Agafonova

PhD candidate, Cherepovets State University
avatar for Zenija Kruzmetra

Zenija Kruzmetra

Assistant Professor , Researcher, Latvia University of Life Science and Tehnologies
NS

Nina Schläfli

doctoral student, University of Bern
MS

Markéta Šantrůčková

Silva Tarouca Research Institute for Landscape and Ornamental Gardening
avatar for Borna Fuerst-Bjeliš

Borna Fuerst-Bjeliš

Full professor, University of Zagreb, Faculty of Science, Department of Geography
Professor of Environmental History and Mediterranean Studies at University of Zagreb. Main research interest in environmental and land use change in Mediterranean karst.



Thursday August 22, 2019 14:00 - 15:30 EEST
Silva Ping-Pong Square (behind Researchers' Forum)

14:30 EEST

15:30 EEST

Book launch coffee break
Book launch coffee break at Researchers’ Forum in Astra building.
Johns Hopkins University Press presents “The Environment: A history of the idea” by Paul Warde, Libby Robin & Sverker Sörlin

Speakers
SS

Sverker Sörlin

Professor, Division of History of Science, Technology and Environment, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm
LR

Libby Robin

Emeritus Professor, ANU



Thursday August 22, 2019 15:30 - 16:00 EEST
Researchers' Forum in Astra Building

15:30 EEST

Coffee break
Coffee breaks are served in two locations: Mare Atrium and Researchers’ Forum in Astra building. In the latter it is accompanied by a book launch.



Thursday August 22, 2019 15:30 - 16:00 EEST
Mare Atrium, 3rd floor / Researchers' Forum in Astra Building

16:00 EEST

5A: Through water: Environmental histories of hydrological systems and resource extraction
Organizer: Giacomo Parrinello, Sciences Po Paris
Chair: Leona Skelton, Northumbria University

The mirage of industrial agriculture: Fossil fuels, groundwater, and irrigation on the High Plains, 1950–1980
Andrew Watson, University of Saskatchewan

Water and sand: Resource extraction and delta retreat in the Po watershed over the twentieth century
Giacomo Parrinello, Sciences Po Paris

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
LS

Leona Skelton

Senior Lecturer, Northumbria University

Speakers
AW

Andrew Watson

Assistant Professor, University of Saskatchewan
avatar for Giacomo Parrinello

Giacomo Parrinello

Assistant Professor of Environmental History, Sciences Po



Thursday August 22, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
S-240

16:00 EEST

5B: Bordering the Little Ice Age and its human consequences: Spatial, temporal and conceptual aspects. Part III: From South-East Europe to the North-West of the continent and beyond
Organizers: Christian Rohr, University of Bern
Heli Huhtamaa, Heidelberg University
Chantal Camenisch, University of York
Chair: Christian Rohr, University of Bern

The impacts of extreme weather on the society of northeast Switzerland at the end of the 17th century: An analysis of the Einsiedeln monastery’s diary (1670–1704)
Lukas Heinzmann, University of Bern

Climate impacts on the society in Rouen during the Little Ice Age (LIA)
Chantal Camenisch, University of York

Neolithisation allergy: Comparative considerations between Europe and Japan on the demographic fluctuations in Neolithisation
Junzo Uchiyama, Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Christian Rohr

Christian Rohr

Full Professor of Environmental and Climate History, Institute of History, University of Bern

Speakers
LH

Lukas Heinzmann

Ph.D. student, University of Bern
CC

Chantal Camenisch

University of Bern
avatar for Junzo Uchiyama

Junzo Uchiyama

Handa Archaeology Fellow, Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures
I am an environmental archaeologist from Japan, interested in prehistoric landscape dynamism from a cross-cultural perspective between East Asia and Northern Europe.



Thursday August 22, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
M-225

16:00 EEST

5C: Roundtable. Histories and futures of “the Environment”
Organizer: Etienne Benson, University of Pennsylvania
Chair: Sverker Sörlin, KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Leah Aronowsky, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Etienne Benson, University of Pennsylvania
Sebastian Grevsmühl, CNRS-EHESS

Abstract:
In the second half of the twentieth century, “the environment” became the focus of a new social movement and the conceptual foundation of numerous laws, institutions, scientific disciplines, and scholarly subfields, including environmental history. Until recently, however, the history of the concept itself has received remarkably little attention from scholars. In their new book, The Environment: A History of the Idea, Paul Warde, Libby Robin, and Sverker Sörlin describe the emergence of this object of concern and its wide-ranging ramifications, which continue to multiply today in domains such as the interdisciplinary environmental humanities and the international environmental justice movement. This roundtable session, featuring historians working at the intersection of environmental history and the history of science, takes The Environment as a starting point for reflections on the origins, development, and possible futures of the idea of “the environment.” Presentations by each of the roundtable participants will be followed by a comment from Sörlin, with ample time reserved for open discussion with the audience. Taken as a whole, the aim of the roundtable is to call attention to the ongoing need for critical historical engagement with the central concept of our field.
The scholars participating in the roundtable have each explored “the environment” in their own work in ways that point to the complexities and perhaps even the multiplicity of this seemingly all-encompassing concept. Leah Aronowsky has studied the emergence and multiple scientific lives of the concept of the biosphere in the postwar United States, showing how knowledge about the biosphere was produced and reified through scientists’ encounters with a broad range of geopolitical developments, including the Cold War nuclear test program, the political economy of natural resource scarcity, systems theory and cybernetics, and the Space Race-era goal of extraterrestrial territorial conquest. Etienne Benson has studied the use of information technologies in ecology and other environmental sciences, including the ways such technologies have been used to make the environment imaginable and manageable on a variety of spatial and temporal scales. Sebastian Grevsmühl has studied the history of the geophysical sciences, environmental history, and the history of exploration, as well as visual culture and the role of images in the sciences, with a particular focus on global environmental images. Sverker Sörlin, in addition to being one of the authors of The Environment, has published extensively on the history of the environmental sciences, Northern and Arctic history, and the environmental humanities.


Moderators
SS

Sverker Sörlin

Professor, Division of History of Science, Technology and Environment, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm

Speakers
LA

Leah Aronowsky

University of Illinois
EB

Etienne Benson

Associate Professor, University of Pennsylvania
SG

Sebastian Grevsmühl

researcher, CNRS-EHESS



Thursday August 22, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
S-238

16:00 EEST

5D: Everyday technologies: Energy use and transition in households
Organizers: Irene Pallua, University of Innsbruck
Jonas Schädler, University of Zürich
Chair: Ute Hasenöhrl, University of Innsbruck

Fuel-use in Medieval Irish towns: Wood, turf and furze
Jim Galloway, Carlow College

Everyday ecology in the Early Modern home: The consumption of fire by Ghent households during the long eighteenth century (c. 1650–1850)
Wout Saelens, University of Antwerp

From single ovens to central heating systems: The heating transition in Switzerland
Irene Pallua, University of Innsbruck

Between power plant and household: The key role of the electricity meter in household energy transitions
Jonas Schädler, University of Zürich

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
UH

Ute Hasenöhrl

University of Innsbruck

Speakers
avatar for Jim Galloway

Jim Galloway

Visiting Lecturer, Carlow College
I am an independent researcher and a visiting lecturer at Carlow College, Ireland. My interests include medieval and early modern environmental history: especially coastal and estuarine environments, woodlands and fuel use, fisheries and urban provisioning.
WS

Wout Saelens

PhD researcher, University of Antwerp
IP

Irene Pallua

PhD Student, University of Innsbruck
JS

Jonas Schädler

PhD Student, University of Zurich



Thursday August 22, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
A-325

16:00 EEST

5E: Environmental histories of teleconnections
Organizer: Juan Infante-Amate, Pablo de Olavide University
Chair: Simone Gingrich, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU)

Historical environmental factors in trade: Advancing the geographical coverage before 1950
John Brolin, Lund University
Astrid Kander, Lund University

The embodied water in Mediterranean agricultural exports, 1900–2010
Rosa Duarte, University of Zaragoza
Vicente Pinilla, University of Zaragoza
Ana Serrano, University of Zaragoza

Land requirements of nutritional transition in Europe, 1901–2013
Juan Infante-Amate, Pablo de Olavide University
Jaume Vila, Pablo de Olavide University
Eduardo Aguilera, Pablo de Olavide University
David Soto, Pablo de Olavide University
Manuel González de Molina, Pablo de Olavide University

Food regimes, global trade flows and natural resource use 1850–2016
Fridolin Krausmann, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna (BOKU)
Ernst Langthaler, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna (BOKU)

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Simone Gingrich

Simone Gingrich

Senior Researcher, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences

Speakers
MG

Manuel González de Molina

Full Professor, Universidad Pablo de Olavide
AS

Ana Serrano

Universidad de Zaragoza
FK

Fridolin Krausmann

Professor, Inst. of Social Ecology, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna
JB

John Brolin

Economic History Department, Lund University



Thursday August 22, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
M-213

16:00 EEST

5F: Histories of waste
Chair: Finn Arne Jørgensen, University of Stavanger

Wasteful cities: A conflict over a sanitary landfill between Helsinki and Espoo
Matti O. Hannikainen, University of Helsinki

It’s a waste not to use it! Composting urban waste in Mandatory Palestine: Between local experts and imperial expertise
Yaron Balslev, Tel Aviv University

Is recycling garbage?
Finn Arne Jørgensen, University of Stavanger

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Finn Arne Jørgensen

Finn Arne Jørgensen

Professor of Environmental History, University of Stavanger
I'm the chair of the program committee for ESEH 2019.

Speakers
MO

Matti O. Hannikainen

University of Helsinki
YB

Yaron Balslev

Tel Aviv University



Thursday August 22, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
A-402

16:00 EEST

5G: Epidemics, history and the environment: Crossing academic boundaries
Organizer: Nicolas Maughan, Aix-Marseille University
Chair: Dominik Collet, University of Oslo

The study of plague in the past and now: Integrating historical and biological approaches
Nils Christian Stenseth, University of Oslo

Major climate-related demographic losses in Mexico during the last 1000 years
Rodolfo Acuna-Soto, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

Urban landscape, society and The Black Death in Toulouse: An interdisciplinary approach to a mortality crisis in the Southwestern France
Michaël Gourvennec, Archeodunum


Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Dominik Collet

Dominik Collet

Professor, University of Oslo

Speakers
NC

Nils Christian Stenseth

Professor, CEES, University of Oslo
RA

Rodolfo Acuna-Soto

Professor, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico
MG

Michaël Gourvennec

Archeodunum - UMR 5608 TRACES



Thursday August 22, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
A-121

16:00 EEST

5H: Global capitalism, local environments
Chair: Roberta Biasillo, KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Swamps and woodlands of the Ottoman Aegean in the age of global capitalism
Onder Eren Akgul, Georgetown University

Assessing environmental risks in credit approval procedures in Slovenia in the 1970s
Željko Oset, University of Nova Gorica

Beyond violence: Commodity, nature and the expansion of a global market in pre-Modern south-eastern Mongolia
Siping Shan, University of London

A new north: Cuisine, culture, and boundaries
L. Sasha Gora, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
RB

Roberta Biasillo

KTH Environmental Humanities Laboratory, Stockholm

Speakers
avatar for Onder Eren Akgul

Onder Eren Akgul

Georgetown University
avatar for Željko Oset

Željko Oset

Assistant professor, University of Nova Gorica
SS

Siping Shan

PhD candidate, SOAS, University of London
My research mainly focusing on the impact of capitalism in pre modern East Asia and Mongolia society.
LS

L. Sasha Gora

Doctoral candidate and instructor, Rachel Carson Center, LMU



Thursday August 22, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
S-236

16:00 EEST

5I: Border crossing and crossing borders in and across Ligurian landscapes
Organizer: Vittorio Tigrino, Università del Piemonte Orientale
Chair: Giulia Beltrametti, Laboratorio di Storia delle Alpi, Università della Svizzera Italiana

‘Above and below the surface’: Border crossings and crossing borders and the environmental histories of the Colombian Exchange in the Mediterranean basin
Robert Hearn, University of Nottingham

The thin boundaries between tenure and ownership: Changes in access to common resources in Ligurian Apennines (17th–21th c.)
Anna Maria Stagno, University of Genoa

Linguistic boundaries in a XVIth century botanical manuscript from the Eastern Ligurian Apennines: Folk taxonomies vs Linnaean nomenclature
Raffaella Bruzzone, University of Nottingham

Liquid boundaries: A microhistorical approach to the Ligurian coastal landscape (Mediterranean, 18th c.)
Vittorio Tigrino, Università del Piemonte Orientale

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Giulia Beltrametti

Giulia Beltrametti

associate researcher, Laboratorio di Storia delle Alpi - Universitą della Svizzera italiana

Speakers
RH

Robert Hearn

Assistant Professor, University of Nottingham
AM

Anna Maria Stagno

associate researcher, University of Genoa
avatar for Raffaella Bruzzone

Raffaella Bruzzone

Research Associate, University of Nottingham
VT

Vittorio Tigrino

assistant professor, Universitą del Piemonte Orientale



Thursday August 22, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
A-224

16:00 EEST

5J: Geography and ideology: The influence of geographical conditions on national perceptions and national settlement
Chair & Organizer: Anat Kidron, Ohalo academic college / Haifa University

A land flowing with milk and honey ...and water? The perception of water availability and its place in the Statism, before and after the establishment of the State of Israel
Orli Sela, David Berg Foundation Institute for Law and History, Tel Aviv University

“A land of salt”. The Dead Sea’s West coast: Changes in landscape and image, 1947–1967
Orit Engelberg-Baram, Haifa University

The influence of the land structure on the settlement discourse in the Acre Bay during the British Mandate period
Anat Kidron, Ohalo academic college / Haifa University

Abstract available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Anat Kidron

Anat Kidron

senior lecturer, Ohalo academic college

Speakers
OS

Orli Sela

Post Doctor, Tel - Aviv University
OE

Orit Engelberg-Baram

PHD student, Haifa University



Thursday August 22, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
M-340

16:00 EEST

5K: Contesting wilderness
Chair: Jane Carruthers, University of South Africa

Euro-American ideas on race and wilderness: Africa-inspired reflections on race and masculinity by Theodore Roosevelt and Akseli Gallen-Kallela
Mikko Saikku, University of Helsinki

Thomas Cole, Native Americans, and the failure to police boundaries of time and place
Chris Slaby, College of William and Mary

“We have never been wild!”: Contesting the transnational production of wilderness in Eastern Europe
George Iordachescu, IMT School for Advanced Studies Lucca

Tanzania’s forgotten “wilderness”
Nicole Wiederroth, University of Duisburg Essen

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
JC

Jane Carruthers

Emeritus Professor, UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICA

Speakers
MS

Mikko Saikku

Professor, University of Helsinki
In addition to heading the Environmental Humanities Hub at Helsinki (https://www.helsinki.fi/en/researchgroups/environmental-humanities/about), I'm currently putting together a formal study module in environmental humanities at the University of Helsinki. All ideas re institutional... Read More →
avatar for Chris Slaby

Chris Slaby

Ph.D. Candidate, College of William & Mary
avatar for George Iordachescu

George Iordachescu

Post-Doctoral Researcher, IMT School for Advanced Studies, Lucca// BIOSEC, The University of Sheffield
Wildernesses/Political ecology/Illegal logging & timber trade/Surveillance/Forest commons.
NW

Nicole Wiederroth

Research Assistant, University of Hamburg



Thursday August 22, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
A-346

17:30 EEST

Coffee break
Coffee breaks are served in two locations: Mare Atrium and Astra Researchers' Forum.


Thursday August 22, 2019 17:30 - 18:00 EEST
Mare Atrium, 3rd floor / Researchers' Forum in Astra Building

18:00 EEST

ESEH Ordinary General Meeting in A222
Business meeting for all ESEH members.


Thursday August 22, 2019 18:00 - 19:30 EEST
A-222

19:30 EEST

ESEH Incoming Regional Representatives Meeting
Newly elected Council of Regional Representatives convenes.


Thursday August 22, 2019 19:30 - 20:30 EEST
A-354
 
Friday, August 23
 

09:00 EEST

6A: Where land and water meet: Histories across the terrestrial–aquatic divide
Organizer: Miles Powell, Nanyang Technological University
Chair: Dolly Jørgensen, University of Stavanger

Singapore’s buried coast: Lost cultural connections and the struggle to preserve a hybrid shore
Miles Powell, Nanyang Technological University

Dredging in the age of ecology
David Stradling, University of Cincinnati

Connections reordering coastal rurality
Tarmo Pikner, Tallinn University

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
DJ

Dolly Jørgensen

University of Stavanger

Speakers
avatar for Miles Powell

Miles Powell

Assistant Professor, NTU, Singapore
I am presently a tenure-track assistant professor of environmental history at NTU-Singapore. My current book project addresses the global environmental, cultural, economic, and food history of human interactions with sharks. Tentatively titled Apex Predators: Encounters with Sharks... Read More →
avatar for David Stradling

David Stradling

Professor of History, University of Cincinnati
I am an urban environmental historian who has recently turned toward water history. I have just begun a long-term project on the global history of dredging. Thus far my research has focused on the Great Lakes, New York City, and to a lesser extend Western Europe.
TP

Tarmo Pikner

Tallinn University



Friday August 23, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
S-240

09:00 EEST

6B: Imaginations of efficiency: Human–plant relations in climate engineering
Organizer: Ariane Tanner, University of Zurich / University of Lucerne
Chair: Etienne S. Benson, University of Pennsylvania

Climate change in the laboratory: Plant engineering in the 1960s
Sabine Höhler, KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Optimizing the “biological pump”. Phytoplankton as the Great Sink of the Anthropocene?
Ariane Tanner, University of Zurich / University of Lucerne

Breathing life: Algae, oxygen, and geoengineering in science fiction and the Baltic Sea
Jesse D. Peterson, KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
EB

Etienne Benson

Associate Professor, University of Pennsylvania

Speakers
avatar for Sabine Höhler

Sabine Höhler

Associate Professor, KTH Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm
I am an Associate Professor of Science and Technology Studies at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm where I head the Division of History of Science, Technology and Environment. I am a physicist by training and received my PhD in history of science and technology... Read More →
AT

Ariane Tanner

lecturer, University of Zurich
Plankton! and history of plankton research.Cultures of remembrance, writing and history, imaginations.Ariane Tanner is an independent researcher and writer. She studied history and philosophy at the University of Zurich; for her PhD at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich... Read More →
JP

Jesse Peterson

KTH Royal Institute of Technology



Friday August 23, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
M-225

09:00 EEST

6C: Baselining nature: On the shifting boundaries of science, policy, and memory in nature conservation and ecological restoration
Organizer: Thomas Lekan, University of South Carolina
Chair: Libby Robin, Australian National University

“An ideal region”: Defining baseline conditions and preservation aims in early Alpine conservation
Wilko Graf von Hardenberg, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science

Decolonizing the savannas: Wildlife conservation and imperial legacies at the Serengeti Research Institute in the 1960s
Thomas Lekan, University of South Carolina

The life of nature restoration projects in the postsocialist world: Practices, policies and histories
Stefan Dorondel, Francisc I. Rainer Institute of Anthropology

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
LR

Libby Robin

Emeritus Professor, ANU

Speakers
avatar for Wilko Graf von Hardenberg

Wilko Graf von Hardenberg

Senior Research Scholar, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science
TL

Thomas Lekan

Professor of History, University of South Carolina
avatar for Stefan Dorondel

Stefan Dorondel

Researcher, Francisc I. Rainer Institute of Anthropology Bucharest



Friday August 23, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
S-238

09:00 EEST

6D: Nuclear fallout
Chair: Kati Lindström, KTH Royal Institute of Technology

“Nuclear” narrative: Shifting boundaries
Inna Sukhenko, University of Helsinki

Chernobyl: Beyond the public–private divide in the Anthropocene
Anna Barcz, University of Dublin

Chernobyl's transnational environmental legacy
Achim Klüppelberg, KTH Royal Institute of Technology

From the place of environmental disaster – to the territory of innovations and the revival of wildlife: Experience of Chernobyl exclusion zone
Tetiana Perga, Institute of World History of National Academy of Science of Ukraine

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Kati Lindström

Kati Lindström

KTH Royal Institute of Technology / KAJAK
I am the ESEH Regional Representative for the Baltic States - come and join our BALTEHUMS lunch on August 21 if you are interested in the Baltic environmental humanities and social sciences.

Speakers
IS

Inna Sukhenko

researcher, the University of Helsinki
avatar for Anna Barcz

Anna Barcz

Trinity Long Room Hub Marie Sk?odowska-Curie Cofund Fellow, Trinity Long Room Hub Arts & Humanities Research Institute, Trinity College Dublin
Currently, I am Trinity Long Room Hub Marie Skłodowska-Curie Cofund Fellow (2018-2019) at Trinity College Dublin. My important books include: Ecorealism: From Ecocriticism to Zoocriticism in Polish Literature (Katowice 2016), Animal Narratives and Culture: Vulnerable Realism (Newcastle... Read More →
avatar for Achim Klüppelberg

Achim Klüppelberg

Doctoral Student, KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Currently, I am working as a doctoral student in the Nuclearwaters-Project (ERC Consolidator Grant, PI Per Högselius) at the Division of History of Science, Technology and Environment. My regional focus is on Eastern and Eastern Central Europe, especially on the territory of the... Read More →
TP

Tetiana Perga

senior researcher, State Institution Institute of World History of National Academy of Science of Ukraine



Friday August 23, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
A-325

09:00 EEST

6E: Plants and peoples in the US–Mexico borderlands
Organizer: Katherine Morrissey, University of Arizona
Chair: Aleksandar Shopov, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society

Telling plant tales in a borderlands
Katherine Morrissey, University of Arizona

The mesquite tree and the Salton Sea: Transformation of the US–Mexican borderland from the desert native’s perspective
Marta Niepytalska, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich

Native invader: The politics of plants and the shifting identity of the creosote bush in 20th- century US–Mexican borderlands
Ligia Arguilez, University of Texas, El Paso

Zombies on the Rio Grande: Tamarisks, toxins, Mexican–American laborers, and environmental justice
Marsha Weisiger, University of Oregon

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
AS

Aleksandar Shopov

Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society

Speakers
KM

Katherine Morrissey

University of Arizona
avatar for Ligia Arguilez

Ligia Arguilez

PhD Student, University of Texas, El Paso
U.S.-Mexico Borderlands / Environmental HistoryPlants and People



Friday August 23, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
M-213

09:00 EEST

6F: Bordering upon waste
Organizer: Iris Borowy, Shanghai University
Chair: Astrid Mignon Kirchhof, Humboldt University of Berlin

“Rubbish between Germans”: A case study on the Dumpsite ‘Schönberg’ (1979–1990)
Sophie Lange, Humboldt University of Berlin

Trawling the trash: Design’s critical engagements with waste
Alice Twemlow, Royal Academy of Art, The Hague

It is such a waste! Solid waste management in Kyrgyzstan and tourist attractiveness
Katarzyna Jarosz, International University of Logistics and Transport in Wrocław

Hazardous waste in the twentieth century: The response of international organizations to an evolving global challenge
Iris Borowy, Shanghai University

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Astrid Mignon Kirchhof

Astrid Mignon Kirchhof

Research Associate, Humboldt University, Berlin
I am an environmental historian of history of ideas and political ecology of socialist and free market societies, esp. West and East Germany.

Speakers
SL

Sophie Lange

PhD Candidate, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin
avatar for Alice Twemlow

Alice Twemlow

Associate Professor, Leiden University
IB

Iris Borowy

Professor, Shanghai University



Friday August 23, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
A-402

09:00 EEST

6G: In the name of progress
Chair: Marco Armiero, KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Breaking down boundaries: Environmental perspectives on democratisation in occupied Japan (1945–1952)
Christopher Aldous, University of Winchester

Environment, technology, and imperial politics in late Ottoman and French Mandate Syria and Lebanon
Elizabeth Williams, UMass Lowell

Brazilian march to the west: Bororos indians and capitalist expansion
Alexia Shellard, The Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ)

Ottoman agricultural reforms between 1890–1909 and its harmful effects on the environment
İbrahim Kışla, Middle East Technical University

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
MA

Marco Armiero

Director, Environmental Humanities Laboratory, KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Speakers
CA

Christopher Aldous

Professor of Modern International History, University of Winchester, UK
EW

Elizabeth Williams

Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts Lowell
avatar for Ibrahim Kışla

Ibrahim Kışla

Student of Middle East Technical University



Friday August 23, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
A-121

09:00 EEST

6H: Roundtable. Merging environmental history, business history, and history of science and technology in the study of natural resources
Chair & Organizer: Per Högselius, KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Stathis Arapostathis, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
Matthias Heymann, Aarhus University
Julia Lajus, National Research University Higher School of Economics
Mats Ingulstad, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Erland Mårald, Umeå University
Urban Wråkberg, UiT The Arctic University of Norway

Abstract:
Historical studies of natural resource extraction are common in environmental history, business history as well as in the history of science and technology, and natural resources figure prominently in the canonical works of all three fields. But even if the object of study is more or less the same, the fields largely operate in isolation from each other. For example, whereas environmental historians love to immerse themselves in the negative environmental impact of natural resource extraction, historians of technology celebrate the ways in which the same extractive activities have opened up totally new technological opportunities. For environmental historians, the history of natural resources is a history of problems; for historians of science and technology, it is a history of solutions; and for business historians – a history of fabulous fortunes and dramatic bankruptcies. How, then, could one possibly merge the three fields and overcome what might seem like an unnecessary academic boundary – and make sure they cross-fertilize each other? The roundtable will look at these and related questions from different geographical academic points of view, comprising scholarly voices from Europe’s north and south, east and west. One theme to take into account will be the value of conceptual bridging ideas such as envirotechnical analysis and commodification processes in the history of natural resources, as seen from different disciplinary angles; another will be the potential of “area studies” (such as Arctic studies, Baltic studies, East European studies, Asian studies, etc.) as arenas for interaction and academic boundary-crossing in the history of resource extraction.

Moderators
PH

Per Högselius

Professor, KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Speakers
SA

Stathis Arapostathis

Assistant Professor, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
MH

Matthias Heymann

Aarhus University
avatar for Julia Lajus

Julia Lajus

Ass. Professor, Higher School of Economics
EM

Erland Mårald

Professor, Umeå University
UW

Urban Wråkberg

Professor, Arctic University of Norway



Friday August 23, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
S-236

09:00 EEST

6I: Special session. History of European environmental protection: A Europe in the World-Café
Facilitators:
Patrick Kupper, University of Innsbruck
Anna-Katharina Wöbse, University of Giessen

Abstract:
We like to use this session to trigger a discussion on the role of environmental historians in (re-)writing the history of Europe. What new perspectives on European history can and should environmental historians contribute? What has our field to offer and what are the opportunities and prospects as well as the difficulties and pitfalls? How can we write truly European environmental histories that leave behind national histories? And how can we overcome the historiographical boundaries in Europe and go beyond collecting and comparing national cases? 
We believe that environmental history is well positioned to rise to the challenge of becoming European. Its community and research are highly internationalized and its subjects of study are transnational “by nature”. Surprisingly and disappointingly, however, the environmental history literature on Europe is most limited, which points to the fact that so fare environmental historians have rarely framed their research and publications as European. Nearly no scholar has explored the historical aspects of Europe’s materiality and spatiality and the many ways people interacted with the continent’s physical features and attributions and vice versa. Neither do European moments of contact and/or collaboration across borders and regions figure prominently in the environmental history scholarship.
In our session we will invite everybody to share his or her experiences, expectations and concerns. At the beginning we will provide a short plenary presentation of a recently started handbook project on the history of European environmental protection, which we are editing and which is part of a new handbook series “Contemporary European History” published by de Gruyter. This will be followed by a World-Café. Contributors to the handbook will be present and host several tables, where the participants will debate, while moving from table to table, various challenges of writing environmental history on the European scale. The group discussions will be recorded in the form of European maps, which will be used in the end to wrap up the session in the plenary.  


Moderators
PK

Patrick Kupper

University of Innsbruck
avatar for Anna-Katharina Wöbse

Anna-Katharina Wöbse

University of Giessen


Friday August 23, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
A-046

09:00 EEST

6J: Mapping land and sea
Chair: Giacomo Parrinello, Sciences Po Paris

Mapping Plus Ultra: Francisco Hernández scientific expedition in New Spain 1570–1577
Adam Wickberg, KTH Royal Institute of Technology

The illusion of permanence: Climate maps and German colonial revisionism
Philipp Lehmann, University of California, Riverside

The satellite and the sea: Transnational collaborations in the Baltics, 1988–1998
Johan Gärdebo, KTH Royal Institute of Technology

An empty seabed: On map making and the creation of a new land and future
Leonoor Zuiderveen Borgesius, University of Oslo

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Giacomo Parrinello

Giacomo Parrinello

Assistant Professor of Environmental History, Sciences Po

Speakers
avatar for Adam Wickberg

Adam Wickberg

Postdoc, KTH Div. of History of Science, Technology & Environment
Adam Wickberg is a Postdoctoral fellow in media history at the Environmental Humanities Lab and a visiting scholar at the Max Planck Institute for History of Science in Berlin (MPWIG I). His current research concerns the Early Modern media history of the Anthropocene, where he traces... Read More →
PL

Philipp Lehmann

Asst. Professor, UC Riverside
avatar for Johan Gärdebo

Johan Gärdebo

KTH Royal Institute of Technology
https://www.kth.se/profile/gardebo
LZ

Leonoor Zuiderveen Borgesius

PhD Candidate, Department for Culture Studies and Oriental Languages, University of Oslo



Friday August 23, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
M-340

09:00 EEST

6K: From red to green? Reassessing the 1991 boundary in (post-)Soviet environmentalism. Part I: Pollution, climate change and soil degradation
Organizer: Benjamin Beuerle, German Historical Institute Moscow
Chair: Julia Obertreis, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

Steppes in crisis? Climate change and the collapse of collectivized agriculture in the virgin lands of post-Soviet Kazakhstan (1980s–2010s)
Marc Elie, CNRS / CERCEC (EHESS, Paris)

The Arctic disaster zone: Russian polar politics and environmental problems (1980s–1990s)
Alexander Ananyev, Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen

Climate change mitigation in late-Soviet and post-Soviet times: The cases of exhaust emissions and renewable energies (late 1970s–2010s)
Benjamin Beuerle, German Historical Institute Moscow

Comment: Stephane Frioux, Université Lumière Lyon 2

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
JO

Julia Obertreis

Professor, University Erlangen-Nuremberg

Speakers
ME

Marc Elie

Researcher, Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Centre d'étude des mondes russe, caucasien et centre-européen (CERC
avatar for Alexander Ananyev

Alexander Ananyev

University of Tübingen
BB

Benjamin Beuerle

Research Fellow, German Historical Institute Moscow



Friday August 23, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
A-346

10:30 EEST

Coffee break
Coffee breaks are served in two locations: Mare Atrium and Astra Researchers' Forum


Friday August 23, 2019 10:30 - 11:00 EEST
Mare Atrium, 3rd floor / Researchers' Forum in Astra Building

11:00 EEST

7A: River histories
Chair: Santiago Gorostiza, ICTA – Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

Border or boundary? The untamed Rhine river, between France and Germany (1648–1815)
Benjamin Furst, Université de Haute-Alsace

Relationship between the communist regime and the rivers: The example of Drava river in Yugoslavia
Hrvoje Petrić, University of Zagreb

Boundaries of rivers, boundaries of technology: Some remarks on Ancient Roman flood management
Jasmin Hettinger, German Maritime Museum

What will ensue to the river and its waters? The coping of the authorities with the water level changes in the Ayalon river (1948–1965)
Assaf Selzer, University of Haif

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Santiago Gorostiza

Santiago Gorostiza

Postdoctoral researcher, Santiago Gorostiza Langa
I am currently on a research stay at the University of Lund (Sweden). Next January I am starting a new position in Paris, for three years!I am interested in:Environmental history of warFascism and natureHuman impacts of the Little Ice Age

Speakers
BF

Benjamin Furst

Researcher, Université de Haute Alsace
Researcher and cartographer at Université de Haute Alsace (France after a PdD in early modern environmental history there and in Montreal), I keep on exploring the links between the developping early modern state and the environment. Talk to me about anything, but I'm particularly... Read More →
avatar for Hrvoje Petrić

Hrvoje Petrić

University of Zagreb
avatar for Jasmin Hettinger

Jasmin Hettinger

German Maritime Museum / Leibniz-Institute for Maritime History
I have finished my PhD research on river floods in the Roman Empire in 2017 and am working ever since as an academic trainee at the German Maritime Museum / Leibniz Institute for Maritime History. I am currently planning a postdoc research project on flood memorials and practices... Read More →
AS

Assaf Selzer

University of Haifa



Friday August 23, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
S-240

11:00 EEST

7B: Special session. Climate witness: Oral history and community-based research
Facilitators:
Tatyana Bakhmetyeva, University of Rochester
Stewart Weaver, University of Rochester

This interactive workshop/roundtable explores innovative approaches to teaching and conducting research in environmental history and global environmental justice, approaches that many have proposed as potential answers to the growing pressure on academia to make research more relevant, inclusive, and responsive to contemporary problems. The workshop raises questions that invite the audience to interrogate the traditional academic boundaries between researchers and their subjects, as well as teachers and students. Among these questions are: who has the right to conduct and own research as the traditional boundaries of scholarship of discovery are expanding to include scholarship of application and scholarship of pedagogy? What is community-based participatory research? How can it be applied to environmental history, and what value is there, if any, in using this approach to study and teach environmental history and global environmental justice?

Moderators
TB

Tatyana Bakhmetyeva

Associate Professor, University of Rochester
SW

Stewart Weaver

Professor, University of Rochester


Friday August 23, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
M-225

11:00 EEST

7C: Scientific bonanzas: Exploring the boundary of infrastructures and environmental knowledge
Organizer: Martin Meiske, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society / Deutsches Museum
Eike-Christian Heine, TU Braunschweig
Chair: Matthias Heymann, Aarhus University

Exploring the Earth through its anthropogenic scars: Geology and the construction of the Panama Canal
Martin Meiske, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society / Deutsches Museum

The West Siberian petroleum complex as a bonanza of Soviet environmental anthropology
Valentina Roxo, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society

Landscapes of calculation: The design agency of cost–benefit analysis in infrastructural projects
Neta Feniger, Tel Aviv University
Roy Kozlovsky, Tel Aviv University

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
MH

Matthias Heymann

Aarhus University

Speakers
avatar for Martin Meiske

Martin Meiske

Postdoctoral Researcher, Deutsches Museum
Hello, I'm a historian working at the intersections of history of science, technology, and environment. I recently defended my PhD project "The Birth of Geoengineering. Large-Scale Enginnering Projects in the Early Stage of the Anthropocene". I am currently organizing an edited volume... Read More →
avatar for Valentina Roxo

Valentina Roxo

Doctoral candidate, Rachel Carson Center
Russian and Soviet environmental history
avatar for Roy Kozlovsky

Roy Kozlovsky

Tel Aviv University



Friday August 23, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
S-238

11:00 EEST

7D: Envisioning oil
Chair: Anu Printsmann, Tallinn University

Building visions and techno-political orders: In pursuance of oil and gas in Southeast Mediterranean, 1950–2017
Stathis Arapostathis, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
Yannis Fotopoulos, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
Serkan Karas, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens

Futures made of petroleum
Tanja Riekkinen, University of Oulu

Visual cultures of mining: Working with the artistic representations of the oil shale industry
Linda Kaljundi, Tallinn University
Tiina-Mall Kreem, Art Museum of Estonia

Blessings, curses and dependencies: Approaching “natural” resources across the
boundaries of the material realm
Fausto Ignatov, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society

Abstracts available HERE

Speakers
avatar for Anu Printsmann

Anu Printsmann

researcher, Centre for Landscape and Culture, School of Humanities, Tallinn University
SA

Stathis Arapostathis

Assistant Professor, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
avatar for Tanja Riekkinen

Tanja Riekkinen

PhD student, University of Oulu
TK

Tiina-Mall Kreem

curator, Art Museum of Estonia
avatar for Fausto Ignatov

Fausto Ignatov

Doctoral Candidate, Rachel Carson Center / LMU Munich



Friday August 23, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
A-325

11:00 EEST

7E: Boundaries of race, nation, species, and space: Southern Africa’s Orange River borderlands
Organizer: Bernard C. Moore, Michigan State University
Chair: Andrea Gaynor, The University of Western Australia

Defining vermin in an apartheid landscape: Southern Namibia, 1950–1990
Bernard C. Moore, Michigan State University

Making sense of Landscape along the Orange River – the example of the failed Gariep Transfrontier Conservation Area
Luregn Lenggenhager, University of Basel

Ethnicity and environment in the early colonial Orange River borderlands: Guides, translations, and the boundaries of “Nama” as a linguistic and cultural category
Andrea Rosengarten, Northwestern University

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Andrea Gaynor

Andrea Gaynor

A/Prof, The University of Western Australia
I'm an environmental historian of Australia, and have diverse research interests, encompassing animal history, urban agriculture, urban water, urban 'nature', agriculture, and more-than-human histories. But really you can talk to me about just about anything.

Speakers
avatar for Bernard C. Moore

Bernard C. Moore

PhD Candidate, Michigan State University
I work in Namibia on agricultural and economic history of the sheep farming (karakul) sector during the apartheid era. I'm also quite interested in human-animal studies and labour history.
avatar for Luregn Lenggenhager

Luregn Lenggenhager

Center for African Studies, University of Basel
AR

Andrea Rosengarten

PhD Candidate in African History, Northwestern University



Friday August 23, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
M-213

11:00 EEST

7F: Environmental histories of transportation
Chair: Kaarel Vanamölder, Tallinn University/KAJAK

Across the river: Vienna’s bridges on the Danube, 1440 to present
Friedrich Hauer, Vienna University of Technology
Severin Hohensinner, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU)

Excluding “heavy trucks” out of the city’s boundaries: A history of an implicit environmental policy, the example of Lyon, 1910s–1980s
Louis Baldasseroni, Université Paris-Est Marne-la-Vallée

The role of ‘early industrial’ canals in reshaping flows of water in Britain
Alice Harvey-Fishenden, University of Liverpool
Neil Macdonald, University of Liverpool

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Kaarel Vanamölder

Kaarel Vanamölder

Associate Professor / Research Fellow, Tallinn University

Speakers
FH

Friedrich Hauer

PhD Student, TU Wien, Department of Urban Design
avatar for Louis Baldasseroni

Louis Baldasseroni

PhD Student, Paris- Est Marne-la-Vallée University, Laboratory ACP
I'm interested in urban environment history, urban planning and mobility history (particularly nuisances of transports in the twentieth century). My PhD deals with street making processes and stakes from the end of 19th century to the end of 20th, with the example of Lyon, France... Read More →
AH

Alice Harvey-Fishenden

PhD student, University of Liverpool



Friday August 23, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
A-402

11:00 EEST

7G: Exploring sources for environmental history
Chair: Paula Schönach, University of Helsinki

The weather diaries of a hunting and fishing estate in Connemara, Co. Galway, Ireland from 1898 to 1972
Kieran Hickey, Department of Geography, University College Cork

A long term view. Precipitation reconstruction for Northwest Portugal between 1600 and 1850: A historical and environmental path for the Iberian Peninsula
Luís Silva, University of Porto, CITCEM / FLUP
Inês Amorim, University of Porto, CITCEM / FLUP

A multidisciplinary approach to tell North Atlantic’s history of globalisation and climate change in 1400–1700 CE
Cordula Scherer, Centre for Environmental Humanities, University of Dublin
Richard Breen, University of Dublin
Patrick Hayes, University of Dublin
Francis Ludlow, University of Dublin
Al Matthews, University of Dublin
John Nicholls, University of Dublin
Kieran Rankin, University of Dublin
Charles Travis, University of Dublin
Poul Holm, University of Dublin

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
PS

Paula Schönach

University of Helsinki

Speakers
avatar for Luís Pedro Silva

Luís Pedro Silva

PhD, Transdisciplinary Research Centre «Culture, Space and Memory» (CITCEM)
Luís Pedro Silva obtained his PhD in History from the University of Porto (Portugal) in 2019, with a thesis on the climate of northwest Portugal between 1600 and 1855. He is currently a researcher at the CITCEM based at the same University. His research interests focus in environmental... Read More →
avatar for Inês Amorim

Inês Amorim

Professor, Transdisciplinary Research Centre «Culture, Space and Memory» (CITCEM/FLUP)
FisheriesSalt historyHistory of ScienceClimate HistoryCrop Losses
avatar for Cordula Scherer

Cordula Scherer

Post-doc Researcher, Trinity College Dublin, Centre for Environmental Humanities
marine ecology, ocean productivity of past times, plankton, sustainable seafood
avatar for Kieran Hickey

Kieran Hickey

Senior Lecturer in Physical Geography, University College Cork, Ireland



Friday August 23, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
A-121

11:00 EEST

7H: Crossing the market’s natural boundaries: Alpine conservation and the obstruction of the European Common Market (1970–2000)
Organizer: Romed Aschwanden, University of Basel
Chair: Patrick Kupper, University of Innsbruck

Networks and negotiations: The EU’s Alpine transit policy
Kira Schmidt, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich

Protecting the heart of Europe: Alpine conservation between protest and political negotiations in Austria
Maria Buck, Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck

Tunneled like a Swiss cheese: Environmental protection as an argument against European integration during the 1990s
Romed Aschwanden, University of Basel

Comment: Jan-Henrik Meyer, Max Planck Institute for European Legal History

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
PK

Patrick Kupper

University of Innsbruck

Speakers
JM

Jan-Henrik Meyer

Researcher, Max Planck Institute for European Legal History
KJ

Kira Janina Schmidt

Doctoral Candidate, LMU/RCC
https://www.uibk.ac.at/projects/issues-with-europe/index.html.de
avatar for Maria Buck

Maria Buck

PhD Student, University of Innsbruck
RA

Romed Aschwanden

PhD-Student, University of Basel



Friday August 23, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
S-236

11:00 EEST

7I: Conservation’s roots: Communities in pre-industrial conservation
Organizer: Abigail Dowling, Mercer University
Chair: Maïka de Keyzer, KU Leuven

Keep the water flowing! Swedish pre-Modern water management
Eva Jakobsson, University of Stavanger / Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Sustaining pre-Modern heathlands (1400–1750): Collective knowledge and peasant communities in the Campine, Belgium
Maïka de Keyzer, KU Leuven

Conserving the ‘vert’ in Early Modern Sherwood forest
Sara Morrison, Brescia University College at Western University

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
MD

Maïka De Keyzer

Assistant professor, KULeuven

Speakers
SM

Sara Morrison

Brescia University College @ University of Western Ontario
EJ

Eva Jakobsson

ass. professor, University of Stavanger
AD

Abigail Dowling

Mercer University



Friday August 23, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
A-224

11:00 EEST

7J: Struggles to protect nature
Chair: Stefan Dorondel, Francisc I. Rainer Institute of Anthropology

Minority protection and nature conservation: A case study from the late 19th century German Empire
Jana Piňosová, Sorbian Institute

Nature and power in interwar Poland
Slawomir Lotysz, Polish Academy of Sciences

Czechoslovakia, 1925: Looking for a place for a national park
Jiří Martínek, The Institute of History, Czech Academy of Science

The establishing new borders of protected territories at the Soviet Union
Alexey Sobisevich, S.I.Vavilov Institute for the History of Science and Technology of the Russian Academy of Sciences

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Stefan Dorondel

Stefan Dorondel

Researcher, Francisc I. Rainer Institute of Anthropology Bucharest

Speakers
JP

Jana Piňosová

Sorbisches Institut e.V. Bautzen
JM

Jiří Martínek

researcher, Historický ústav AV ČR, Praha
avatar for Alexey Sobisevich

Alexey Sobisevich

senior reseacher, S.I.Vavilov Institute for the History of Science and Technology of the Russian Academy of Sciences
I am geographer and ecological historian. My research interests are focusing on the history of Soviet geography, ecology, and pedology. The personal contribution of Boris Polinov, Vladimir Komarov, Evgenia Ivanova, Victor Kovda, Innokentij Gerasimov, Stanislav Kalesnik, Yuri Israel... Read More →



Friday August 23, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
M-340

11:00 EEST

7K: From red to green? Reassessing the 1991 boundary in (post-)Soviet environmentalism. Part II: Actors between triumph and nostalgia
Organizer: Timm Schönfelder, University of Tübingen
Chair: Elena Kochetkova, National Research University Higher School of Economics

From ‘Golden Age’ to irrigation nostalgia: Hydro-melioration in post-Soviet Russia (1986–2016)
Timm Schönfelder, University of Tübingen

From socialist vigilantism to neoliberal disaster management: How student green activists made it into New Russia (1960s–2010s)
Laurent Coumel, National Institute for Oriental Languages and Civilizations (INALCO)

Where have all the greens gone? Anti-nuclear activists after the ecological boom in Ukraine, Belarus, and Lithuania (1980s–2010s)
Melanie Arndt, Leibniz Institute for East and Southeast European Studies

Comment: Julia Herzberg, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
EK

Elena Kochetkova

National Research University Higher School of Economics - St. Petersburg

Speakers
TS

Timm Schönfelder

Research assistant, University of Tübingen
Interested in Russian and Soviet Environmental history, just finished my dissertation on hydromelioration in the North Caucasus (1879-1991), now preparing a project on the history of hunting in Russia (1861-1929).
LC

Laurent Coumel

assistant professor, CREE, INALCO University, Paris
MA

Melanie Arndt

Leibniz Institute for East and Southeast European Studies (IOS)
JH

Julia Herzberg

Professor, LMU Munich



Friday August 23, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
A-346

12:30 EEST

Lunch
Warm lunch is served in two locations: Mare Atrium and Astra Researchers' Forum 


Friday August 23, 2019 12:30 - 14:00 EEST
Mare Atrium, 3rd floor / Researchers' Forum in Astra Building

13:00 EEST

WEHN Lunch (register by Aug 20)
Women’s Environmental History Network’s no-host lunch at NOP Café (Köleri 1). Registered participants only (RSVP by August 20 to srhamilton@auburn.edu)

Moderators
avatar for Sarah Hamilton

Sarah Hamilton

Associate Professor, Auburn University

Friday August 23, 2019 13:00 - 14:00 EEST
NOP Café

14:00 EEST

Plenary Roundtable. Boundaries in/of Environmental History
We reflect on where do the boundaries run within the environment, history and environmental history? And where are the boundaries of the discipline itself?

Dolly Jørgensen is a professor of history at the University of Stavanger, Norway. Her new monograph Recovering Lost Species in the Modern Age: Histories of Longing and Belonging is coming out with MIT Press in 2019 .She has previously co-edited several books on technology and environment, including New Natures: Joining Environmental History with Science and Technology Studies (2013). She was twice President of ESEH (2013-17).

Kalevi Kull is a professor for biosemiotics at University of Tartu, Estonia. He started as a biologist and became the founding father of biosemiotics as a new discipline. As an expert in the field of ecology, theoretical biology, and semiotics, he has worked in elucifating the basic mechanisms of meaning-making and diversification in living systems. He is the editor of the journal Sign System Studies, and co-author of many books on theoretical biology and biosemiotics (Biosemiotic Perspectives on Language and Linguistics (2015), Theoretical Biology in Estonia, 1985).

Andrea Gaynor is an Associate Professor in History at The University of Western Australia. Her research seeks to use the contextualising and narrative power of environmental history to solve real-world problems. She is author of the book Harvest of the Suburbs: an Environmental History of Growing Food in Australian Cities (2006), co-editor of Never Again: Reflections on Environmental Responsiblilty After Roe 8 (2017), and co-editor of Reclaiming the Urban Commons: The past, present and future of food growing in Australian towns and cities (2018).

Franz Mauelshagen is a Senior Fellow at the Centre for Global Cooperation Research / Käte Hamburger Kolleg at the University of Duisburg, where his research is work is on planetary politics in the Anthropocene, and he is also affiliated at the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies in Potsdam. His forthcoming monograph Clio meets Gaia: History in the Anthropocene (translation from German title) is on the implications of a new geological era for our understanding of history. Recently, he has co-edited The Palgrave Handbook of Climate History (2018) and Climate Change and Cultural Transition in Europe (2018).

Stefania Barca is a senior researcher at the Center for Social Studies of the University of Coimbra. She holds a PhD in Economic History (Italy 1997) and has been a visiting scholar at Yale University (2005-06), postdoctoral fellow at UC Berkeley (2006-08), and guest professor at Lund University (2015-16). Her monograph Enclosing Water. Nature and Political Economy in a Mediterranean Valley, 1796-1916 (White Horse Press, 2010) was awarded the Turku book prize in 2011; she has served as ESEH vice-president for the 2011-13 term and as member of editorial board of Environmental History in 2014-17. In the past ten years, she has written about the environmental history and political ecology of labour in transnational perspective and is now working on a new book manuscript called Forces of Reproduction. An Anti-Master Narrative of the Anthropocene, to be published in the series Elements in Environmental Humanities by Cambridge University Press.

Moderators
DJ

Dolly Jørgensen

University of Stavanger

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Gaynor

Andrea Gaynor

A/Prof, The University of Western Australia
I'm an environmental historian of Australia, and have diverse research interests, encompassing animal history, urban agriculture, urban water, urban 'nature', agriculture, and more-than-human histories. But really you can talk to me about just about anything.
SB

Stefania Barca

Center for Social Studies - University of Coimbra



Friday August 23, 2019 14:00 - 15:30 EEST
A002 / A222

15:30 EEST

Book launch coffee break
Book launch coffee break at Researchers’ Forum in Astra building.
White Horse Press presents “Seeds of Power: Explorations in Ottoman Environmental History” edited by Onur Inal and Yavuz Köse, and “The State in the Forest. Contested Commons in the Nineteenth Century Venetian Alps” by Giacomo Bonan

Speakers
OI

Onur Inal

Post-Doctoral Researcher, Near Eastern Studies Department, University of Vienna
GB

Giacomo Bonan

University of Bologna



Friday August 23, 2019 15:30 - 16:00 EEST
Researchers' Forum in Astra Building

16:00 EEST

8A: Boundaries of coldness: Russian and Soviet coldness talks and experiences between politics, ideology and nature
Organizer: Ekaterina Emeliantseva Koller, University of Zurich
Chair: Julia Lajus, National Research University Higher School of Economics

The hunt for cold in Tsarist and Soviet Russia
Julia Herzberg, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich

Archipelagos of warmth. Soviet mining on Svalbard and the challenge of Arctic cold, 1931–1950
Felix Frey, University of Bern

Coldness as imagination and resource in a Cold War bastion of late Soviet Union: “Coldness talk” in a closed city of Severodvinsk
Ekaterina Emeliantseva Koller, University of Zurich

Comment: Marc Elie, Le Centre d’études des mondes russe, caucasien et centre-européen (CERCEC)

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Julia Lajus

Julia Lajus

Ass. Professor, Higher School of Economics

Speakers
ME

Marc Elie

Researcher, Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Centre d'étude des mondes russe, caucasien et centre-européen (CERC
JH

Julia Herzberg

Professor, LMU Munich
FF

Felix Frey

Postdoctoral Researcher, University of Bern
avatar for Ekaterina Emeliantseva Koller

Ekaterina Emeliantseva Koller

Professor, University of Zurich



Friday August 23, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
S-240

16:00 EEST

8B: Flood policy and practice
Chair: Eva Jakobsson, University of Stavanger

Past flooding, present solutions: The use of history in flood risk management in England since c.1750
John Morgan, University of Manchester

Containing vs accepting floods: Concepts of river management in modern Japan
Julia Mariko Jacoby, University of Freiburg

Doing it outdoors! Reconnecting pasts and futures in environmental water histories by working with practitioners, managers and publics
Leona Skelton, Northumbria University

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
EJ

Eva Jakobsson

ass. professor, University of Stavanger

Speakers
JM

John Morgan

Lecturer in Early Modern History, University of Manchester
avatar for Julia Mariko Jacoby

Julia Mariko Jacoby

PhD candidate, University of Freiburg
LS

Leona Skelton

Senior Lecturer, Northumbria University



Friday August 23, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
M-225

16:00 EEST

8C: Towards the ecological turn in Scandinavia, 1950s–1970s
Chair & Organizer: David Larsson Heidenblad, Lund University

Environmental humanities in the 1960s: The history of a rejected research application
David Larsson Heidenblad, Lund University

Something new, something old, something borrowed, and something blue: Environmentalism in the 1970s Denmark
Asger Hougaard, University of Bergen

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for David Larsson Heidenblad

David Larsson Heidenblad

Associate Professor, Lund University, Department of History

Speakers
AH

Asger Hougaard

University of Bergen



Friday August 23, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
S-238

16:00 EEST

8D: Crossing boundaries in human-animal relations
Chair: Andrew Flack, University of Bristol

The baboon in the bedroom: Unnatural histories of the simian ‘other’
Sandra Swart, Stellenbosch University

Russian imperial family and domestic dogs: Erosion of borders
Olga Solodyankina, Cherepovets State University

Hybrid ties between human and nonhuman animals in the formation of Brazilian society: A history to be told
Ana Lucia Camphora, Helio Alonso College

“Vermin”: Predator eradication as an expression of white supremacy in colonial Namibia, 1921–1952.
John Heydinger, University of Minnesota / Macquarie University

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
AF

Andrew Flack

Lecturer in Modern and Environmental History, University of Bristol
Animal history, science, technology

Speakers
SS

Sandra Swart

PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITY OF STELLENBOSCH
avatar for Olga Solodyankina

Olga Solodyankina

Professor, Cherepovets State University
avatar for Ana Lucia Camphora

Ana Lucia Camphora

researcher, Independent schollar
Degree in Psychology from Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (1988), Master Degree in Psychossociology of Communities and Social Ecology from EICOS/Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (2003) and Doctorate in Social Sciences from CPDA/Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro... Read More →
JH

John Heydinger

PhD Candidate, Macquarie University/University of Minnesota



Friday August 23, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
A-325

16:00 EEST

8E: Environmental colonialism
Chair: Wilko Graf von Hardenberg, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science

A roving eye: Tudor England’s view of Ireland
Tara Rider, Stony Brook University

From equine frontier to sylvan polity: The environmental legacy of the Mongol Empire in Early Modern Korea, 1270–1700
John Lee, University of Manchester

Environmental colonialism in the interwar period: The reclamation and social engineering project in a southern Macedonian lake, 1913–1940
George L. Vlachos, European University Institute

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Wilko Graf von Hardenberg

Wilko Graf von Hardenberg

Senior Research Scholar, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science

Speakers
avatar for Tara Rider

Tara Rider

Lecturer - School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University
JS

John S. Lee

Presidential Fellow in Environmental History, University of Manchester
avatar for George L. Vlachos

George L. Vlachos

PhD Candidate



Friday August 23, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
M-213

16:00 EEST

8F: Landscapes of war
Chair: Santiago Gorostiza, ICTA – Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

Unlocking the “closed border zone”: Presences and absences of the military past of the coastal landscape of the southeastern Baltic Sea
Kristīne Krumberga, University of Latvia

Crossing ecosystem boundaries due to conflicts over political boundaries: Introduction of Telekia speciosa to the Julian Alps during World War I
Žiga Zwitter, University of Ljubljana

Fields into factories: The shifting of boundaries by the expansion of Britain’s military-industrial capacity during World War II
Gary Willis, University of Bristol

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Santiago Gorostiza

Santiago Gorostiza

Postdoctoral researcher, Santiago Gorostiza Langa
I am currently on a research stay at the University of Lund (Sweden). Next January I am starting a new position in Paris, for three years!I am interested in:Environmental history of warFascism and natureHuman impacts of the Little Ice Age

Speakers
avatar for Kristīne Krumberga

Kristīne Krumberga

University of Latvia
ZZ

Žiga Zwitter

asst. prof., researcher, University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Arts (i.e. humanities), Dept. of History
avatar for Gary Willis

Gary Willis

PhD Student (2nd Year), University of Bristol
I have a particular interest in the historical environmental impact of war, especially the Second World War, and Britain. My PhD looks at the impact on the rural landscape of Britain's war effort, in particular new-build military-industrial sites constructed from 1936 onwards, and... Read More →



Friday August 23, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
A-402

16:00 EEST

8G: Socio-ecological perspectives on forest transitions
Organizer: Simone Gingrich, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences
Chair: Péter Szabó, Czech Academy of Sciences

A socioecological reading of the forest transition in the United States
Andreas Magerl, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences
Simone Gingrich, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences

Forest transition and carbon cycles in France (1800–2018): A socio-ecological metabolism perspective
Julia Le Noë, Sorbonne University

New evidence on Spain’s forest transition (1860–2010). Land-use and wood stocks change at a regional scale
Iñaki Iriarte-Goñi, Universidad de Zaragoza
Juan Infante-Amate, Universidad Pablo de Olavide de Sevilla


What drove the forest transition in Austria? A counterfactual analysis
Simone Gingrich, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU)
Christian Lauk, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU)

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Péter Szabó

Péter Szabó

Institute of Botany of the Czech Academy of Sciences

Speakers
avatar for Andreas Magerl

Andreas Magerl

Institute of Social Ecology, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna
avatar for Simone Gingrich

Simone Gingrich

Senior Researcher, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences
avatar for Iñaki Iriarte-Goñi

Iñaki Iriarte-Goñi

Professor, Universidad de Zaragoza
avatar for Julia Le Noë

Julia Le Noë

Dr, Institute of Social Ecology, BOKU university
I am a biogeochemist working within the conceptual framework of socio-ecology. Until now my researches have been mostly focused on agricultural and forestry ecosystems. I try to assess over long-time period (one century or more) how land use for food, feed and energy supplies shapes... Read More →



Friday August 23, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
A-121

16:00 EEST

8H: Crossing boundaries: New frontiers of resource extraction (20th–21st century)
Chair & Organizer: Ole Sparenberg, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

Gondwana’s promises: German geologists in Antarctica between basic science and resource exploration in the late 1970s
Christian Kehrt, Technical University of Braunschweig

Cities, places and people in industrialized post-Soviet Arctic borderlands: The case of Pechenga district, north-west Russia.
Peter Haugseth, UiT - The Arctic University of Norway

Mining technologies and (not) mining in Antarctica
Lize-Marié van der Watt, KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Metals from the ocean: Deep-sea mining and the abyssal plains, 1965–2019
Ole Sparenberg, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
Speakers
PH

Peter Haugseth

Assistant Professor, UiT-The Arctic University of Norway
LV

Lize-Marié van der Watt

Researcher, KTH Royal Instititute of Technology
avatar for Christian Kehrt

Christian Kehrt

professor of history, TU Braunschweig
polar regions, cold war, aviation, resource politics, transnational resource spaces



Friday August 23, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
S-236

16:00 EEST

8I: Landscapes transformed
Chair: Markéta Šantrůčková, Silva Tarouca Research Institute for Landscape and Ornamental Gardening

Heritage of lost landscapes in Czechia
Tomáš Burda, Charles University Prague

The role of irrigation on the regional divergences of Spanish agricultural production: Analysis during the second globalization
Ana Serrano, Universidad de Zaragoza
Ignacio Cazcarro, Universidad de Zaragoza
Miguel Martín-Retortillo, Universidad de Alcalá

Landscape planning in Israel: Between the natural and the cultural scenery
Tal Alon-Mozes, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology

Coffee planters and the origins of conservation in colonial Ceylon
Arjun Guneratne, Macalester College

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
MS

Markéta Šantrůčková

Silva Tarouca Research Institute for Landscape and Ornamental Gardening

Speakers
TB

Tomáš Burda

Assistant Professor, Charles University Prag / University Hradec Kralove
AS

Ana Serrano

Universidad de Zaragoza
avatar for Ignacio Cazcarro

Ignacio Cazcarro

ARAID -, Universidad de Zaragoza - ARAID - Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2)
MM

Miguel Martín-Retortillo

Assistant Professor, Universidad de Alcala
avatar for Tal Alon-Mozes

Tal Alon-Mozes

Assoc. Prof., Technion Israel Institute of Technology
avatar for Arjun Guneratne

Arjun Guneratne

Professor, Macalester College
My research focuses on issues of biodiversity conservation, and the history of natural history with particular reference to the history of ornithology. I am also interested in the Anthropocene and how humanists and social scientists can engage with the concept.



Friday August 23, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
A-224

16:00 EEST

8J: Creating gender boundaries: Encounters, identity, and environment
Organizer: Katie Holmes, La Trobe University
Chair: Alexandra Vlachos, University of Western Australia / Australian National University

To save a whale: The gendering of Greenpeace 1975–1977
Joanna Dean, Carleton University

Sustaining gendered boundaries: Settlers in Queensland’s Callide Valley in the 1930s
Margaret Cook, University of Queensland

Mallee masculinity: Race, place and gender in the Mallee lands of south east Australia
Katie Holmes, La Trobe University, Melbourne

On horses and women: Fights for gender equality and animal rights in nineteenth-century Riga
Ulrike Plath, Tallinn University / Estonian Academy of Sciences

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
AV

Alexandra Vlachos

Visiting Research Fellow, Australian National University

Speakers
avatar for Ulrike Plath

Ulrike Plath

Professor for Baltic German Studies and Environmental History, Tallinn University
Enjoy the conference!!!!
avatar for Joanna Dean

Joanna Dean

Associate Professor, History, Carleton University
I am an environmental historian working on the history of human relations with plants and animals. Most recently, I co-edited Animal Metropolis: Histories of Human Animal Relations in Urban Canada (2017). I am currently writing a book about street trees in Ottawa. At the ESEH, I... Read More →
avatar for Margaret Cook

Margaret Cook

Hon. Research Fellow, La Trobe University
Interested in water history and politics, especially floods. My current research project is agricultural history in Queensland, Australia with a focus on gender, water and cotton.
avatar for Katie Holmes

Katie Holmes

Professor, La Trobe University
I live in Melbourne and work at La Trobe University. I am particularly interested in gender and environmental history, and in the relationship between history and activism in the current global context



Friday August 23, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
M-340

16:00 EEST

8K: Roundtable. Capitalism and communism revisited: Environmentalism and environmental policy during the Cold War and beyond
Organizer: Astrid Mignon Kirchhof, Humboldt University of Berlin
Chair: Iris Borowy, Shanghai University

Bart Elmore, Ohio State University
Marco Armiero, KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Jan-Henrik Meyer, Max Planck Institute for European Legal History
Kateryna Karpenko, Kharkiv National Medical University

Abstract:
The rise of environmentalism as a social movement, and the formation of environmental policy as a state initiative coincided with the Cold War (c. 1946–1991). However, this is not coincidental. The capitalist and Communist camps shared many priorities. And variation within those two camps was often as great as variation between them. Our aim is to contribute to current debates about the implications for nature of the two foremost political and economic orders of the twentieth century. Among the motivations for this comparison was the observation that in recent years citizens worldwide started thinking of a third way beyond the twentieth century’s two dominant political-ideological systems. Although the Socialist world lost its relevance for many years after the Iron Curtain fell, many critiques lately offer eco socialist claims to improve the quality of life for everyone. They ask for life in harmony with nature and environmental justice, and connect these ideas with eco socialist stances against global capitalism. They demand a Socialist (not Communist) theory of nature-society relations, because on that score the economic system of Communist states hardly differed from that of capitalist states—both systems promoted economic accumulation, Taylorist work organization, and an exploitative understanding of nature. We would like to discuss – amongst others - three hypotheses, which we hope will trigger further research and debates in terms of environmentalism beyond the two dominating systems of the twentieth century. First, society needs to empower itself. While capitalism expanded the power of capital, Communism empowered the state. In the power triangle of capital-state- society, it is society that needs empowerment. Freedom of speech seems to be a necessary condition for the protection of environment. Even though environmental movements are not always successful, they seem to be a precondition to effective critique of environmental exploitation and the necessary changes in politics that any reduction in environmental exploitation requires. Second, the value and practicality of common goods needs rethinking. A traditional liberal critique claims that economies built on common property will suffer because public goods will not be maintained. Research on common property has shown that collective properties have been maintained over long periods of time and can be the base of innovative technological processes. Traditional commons such as pastures and forests, fish stocks, irrigation systems, roads, buildings, and so forth over centuries were collectively used and sustainably maintained by communities. Where communities have agreed upon rules for regulating common property use and access, they have found it feasible to maintain common property and prevent environmental overexploitation. Third, both planned and liberal economies have shown strong tendencies toward the exploitation of nature and the prioritization of economic growth over ecological stability. Both systems have major demonstrated defects when it comes to the exploitation of both nature and human beings. The world needs answers— and therefore questions and research—concerning strategies for both greater global equality and nature protection. Is it possible to create an economy that respects society, democracy, and nature?

Moderators
IB

Iris Borowy

Professor, Shanghai University

Speakers
avatar for Kateryna Karpenko

Kateryna Karpenko

Professor, Head of the Philosophy Department, Kharkiv National Medical University
JM

Jan-Henrik Meyer

Researcher, Max Planck Institute for European Legal History
MA

Marco Armiero

Director, Environmental Humanities Laboratory, KTH Royal Institute of Technology
BE

Bart Elmore

Assistant Professor, Ohio State University



Friday August 23, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
A-346

17:30 EEST

Poster Prize Reception and Local Products Fair
ESEH Poster Prize will be awarded to the best poster!!!! Come and see!!!!
White Horse Press sponsors the prize.

At the same time, our local micro-entrepreneurs have come to offer there stuff. Not the least the conference beer!!!! In cooperation with the brewery Humalakoda, students of Tallinn University brewed a special conference beer for you as a part of project-based learning. This historical Pale Ale of 4,2% was named Kuuse Willem (Spruce Will). It is made by using 2 kg spruce tips from Ulrike’s garden and 120 kg of carrots (not from Ulrike’s garden) and is an interpretation of a local spruce beer recipe from 1805. You can taste the beer for free on August 23 during the local products fair and at the closing ceremony! Taste it, enjoy it, praise it! There is also a limited amount of bottles for you to buy and take home. Do not miss the chance to taste it and learn a bit more of how it was brewed. 


Friday August 23, 2019 17:30 - 19:00 EEST
Researchers' Forum in Astra Building

17:30 EEST

Excursion. Edgelands: The Coasts of Tallinn. Gathering at Mare building Meeting Point.
Start of the excursion: 17:35 Mare building Meeting Point (Mare 0 floor)
End of the excursion: 19:30 near the Seaplane Harbour

The walking tour around the Tallinn seaside closely relates to the conference theme of borders – physical and ideological, as well as mental. Tallinn is proud to be a harbour city (boasting about 12 historical ports on its shore) but the sea has been hidden and out of sight for half-a-century. On this trip we focus on the remains of the Soviet (military) past and the current challenges of governing the seaside, private and public interests, more-than-human environments (wild, cultural and edge being some of the key words). We start by the Linnahall (City Hall built for the sailing events of the Moscow Olympic Games in 1980) at and wander alongside the shore to Telliskopli – a historic industrial area now experiencing a revival with all its varied effects. The hike takes us past the Culture Cauldron and Contemporary Art Museum as well as the Seaplane Harbour, all much-talked-about in recent years. The excursion ends near the Seaplane Harbour (from there, You can take bus or walk back to the city center).

Please bring good walking shoes with you! You will walk through urban wilderness, climb in ruins etc.!  

Speakers
TP

Tiina Peil

Södertörn University


Friday August 23, 2019 17:30 - 19:30 EEST
Mare building Meeting Point

18:00 EEST

RCC Meeting

Friday August 23, 2019 18:00 - 21:00 EEST
A-346

19:00 EEST

ESEH Incoming Board Meeting
Newly elected ESEH Board gathers. (Snacks will be served)


Friday August 23, 2019 19:00 - 20:00 EEST
M-649

19:00 EEST

Movie night: “Nightingales in Berlin”
David Rothenberg, producer, and Ville Tanttu, director. Q&A with the filmmakers.
Chair: Kadri Tüür, Tallinn University

This film tells the story of David Rothenberg’s efforts to gather together an international band of musicians to cross the species line and make music live with nightingales. Because of its spacious parks and the large number of enthusiastically singing birds, Berlin is the best city to make music with nightingales. Almost everything one plays to a nightingale will encourage him to sing more. These encounters becomes a direct window into the unknown, a touch of communication with a being with whom we cannot speak. The play of pure tones jarring against click and buzz, it all becomes not a code but a groove, an amphitheater of rhythms in which we strive to find a place. 
One of the most beautiful things about this project is to film and record a musician who first encounters a nightingale song, with no preconceptions. These are truly amazing moments. We include as many as we can, and then we visit the scientists devoting their careers to decoding the practical meaning that may or may not lie inside the patterns and sequences sung by these amazing birds, whose beautiful song ties cultures, and traditions together in these midnight encounters in the parks of Berlin.

Learn more:
https://www.nightingalesinberlin.com/film

Moderators
avatar for Kadri Tüür

Kadri Tüür

head, KAJAK

Speakers

Friday August 23, 2019 19:00 - 21:00 EEST
Kino SuperNova, Nova building, room N-406, 4th floor
 
Saturday, August 24
 

09:00 EEST

9A: Religion and environment
Chair: Kati Lindström, KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Sacred oak groves in the national epic “Kalevipoeg” and the Estonian civil religion
Ott Heinapuu, Tallinn University

Return of nature deities in Bolivian politics
Henriette Eva Stierlin, University of Zürich

Religion, environment, and society: Religious pluralism in Istanbul during the Great Plague of 1661
M. Fatih Calisir, Kirklareli University

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Kati Lindström

Kati Lindström

KTH Royal Institute of Technology / KAJAK
I am the ESEH Regional Representative for the Baltic States - come and join our BALTEHUMS lunch on August 21 if you are interested in the Baltic environmental humanities and social sciences.

Speakers
OH

Ott Heinapuu

PhD student, University of Tartu
HE

Henriette Eva Stierlin

Research Associate, UZH Zürich
Nature deities in the Bolivian politics
avatar for Muhammed Fatih Calisir

Muhammed Fatih Calisir

Assistant Professor, Kirklareli University



Saturday August 24, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
S-240

09:00 EEST

9B: “When the rivers run dry". A cross-continental journey of historical droughts, impacts and human response I
Chair & Organizer: Andrea Kiss, Vienna University of Technology

Contemporary drought in perspective: Combining documentary evidence and instrumental data to assess the severity of the 2015–16 drought in northern South Africa
David Nash, University of Brighton
Clare Kelso, University of Johannesburg


Droughts in the area of Poland in recent centuries
Rajmund Przybylak, Nicolaus Copernicus University
Piotr Oliński, Nicolaus Copernicus University
Marcin Koprowski, Nicolaus Copernicus University
Janusz Filipiak, Nicolaus Copernicus University
Aleksandra Pospieszyńska, Nicolaus Copernicus University
Waldemar Chorążyczewski, Nicolaus Copernicus University
Radosław Puchałka, Nicolaus Copernicus University
Henryk P. Dąbrowski, Nicolaus Copernicus University


Documentary evidence of droughts in Sweden between the Middle Ages and c1800
Dag Retsö, University of Stockholm

The 664 year long series of grape harvest dates from Beaune and its significance for past and present climate
Thomas Labbé, University of Bourgogne
Christian Pfister, University of Bern

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
AK

Andrea Kiss

s. research scientist, Vienna University of Technology, Austria

Speakers
DN

David Nash

Professor of Physical Geography, University of Brighton
RP

Rajmund Przybylak

Professor, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Department of Meteorology and Climatology
Research Interests:Climate of the polar regions and Poland; climatic change and its cause.Reconstruction of the Arctic and central Europe climates in the last millennium
avatar for Piotr Oliński

Piotr Oliński

Prof., Nicolaus Copernicus University
Historical Climatology, Medieval History, Middle Europe
DR

Dag Retsö

associate professor, Dept of economic history and international relations, Stockholm University
CP

Christian Pfister

Emeritus researcher, University of Bern
currently I am working on a book related to the history of climate and peope in Europe since the last 1000 yrs. Climatic change, Energy, Economics Population. Extrene events



Saturday August 24, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
M-225

09:00 EEST

9C: Special session. The Happy historian: How to survive and even thrive in the "academic Anthropocene"
Facilitator:
Sandra Swart, Stellenbosch University

This is a crash course in "life hacking" for the academic historian who is trying to survive in global warming's equivalent at the university: the rising waters of tenure insecurity, the increasing heat on publishing, and the freak storms of austerity measures in the corporate academe.
The workshop is intended for a small, interactive group and will include:
1. How to think in ink - publishing made more efficient.
2. How to manage (and protect!) your "writing time".
3. How to manage toxic interference.
The workshop is intended to offer one of the most useful hours at the conference because it focuses on the thing historians care about most - "time". Only this time it is *your* time.


Moderators
SS

Sandra Swart

PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITY OF STELLENBOSCH


Saturday August 24, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
S-238

09:00 EEST

9D: Animals crossing borders
Chair: Dolly Jørgensen, University of Stavanger

Fencing out nativeness? Western Australia’s State Barrier fence in historical perspective
Alexandra Vlachos, Australian National University

The muskrat’s new frontier: The challenge of an American animal empire in Europe
Peter Coates, University of Bristol

Bison pathways: Crossing and confronting social, ecological and political boundaries on the road to conservation at Yellowstone National Park
Randall Wilson, Gettysburg College

“Shapeless masses”: The transportation of skins for Victorian taxidermy re-creation
Alice Would, University of Bristol / University of Exeter

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
DJ

Dolly Jørgensen

University of Stavanger

Speakers
AV

Alexandra Vlachos

Visiting Research Fellow, Australian National University
PC

Peter Coates

University of Bristol
avatar for Randall Wilson

Randall Wilson

Professor of Environmental Studies, Gettysburg College
I study protected areas and public lands in the United States and Europe, I am finishing up a book on Yellowstone National Park
AW

Alice Would

PhD Candidate, University of Bristol and University of Exeter



Saturday August 24, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
A-325

09:00 EEST

9E: Issues of environmental justice
Chair: Hrvoje Petrić, University of Zagreb

An approach to the allocation of nature: The political ecology of Lusatia
Marcel Langer, The Sorbian Institute

Toxic poisoning performed: El Teatro Campesino and the farmworkers struggle for justice
Erik Wallenberg, The City University of New York

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Hrvoje Petrić

Hrvoje Petrić

University of Zagreb

Speakers
EW

Erik Wallenberg

PhD Candidate, CUNY Graduate Center
ML

Marcel Langer

Sorbian Institute



Saturday August 24, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
M-213

09:00 EEST

9F: Envirotech histories of the Ottoman and post-Ottoman world
Organizer: Camille Cole, Yale University
Chair: Onur Inal, University of Hamburg

Shibbolethic science: Bodies as technology in the Egyptian sugar cane industry (1890–1910)
Taylor Moore, Rutgers University

Paper technologies: Land deeds and land theft in late Ottoman Basra
Camille Cole, Yale University

Ecologies by design: Creating an agro-industrial complex in Central Anatolia, 1903–1928
Sean Lawrence, University of California Santa Cruz

A people freed from need: Security, sustainability and the state in southeastern Anatolia
Dale Stahl, University of Colorado Denver

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
OI

Onur Inal

Post-Doctoral Researcher, Near Eastern Studies Department, University of Vienna

Speakers
TM

Taylor Moore

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
CC

Camille Cole

Yale University
SL

Sean Lawrence

Ph.D. Candidate, University of California, Santa Cruz
DS

Dale Stahl

Assistant Professor, University of Colorado Denver



Saturday August 24, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
A-402

09:00 EEST

9G: Lost in the woods: Territorial governance and forest use
Organizer: Marina Loskutova, National Research University Higher School of Economics
Chair: Anna Sténs, Umeå University

“Black Forest”: Resources, boundaries and constraints for local communities in the Russian North in the 17th century
Margarita Dadykina, National Research University Higher School of Economics

The Russian state and the limits of bureaucratic control in forest use at the turn of the 18th–19th centuries
Marina Loskutova, National Research University Higher School of Economics

Die Indischen Wälder: Germany and the birth of the Indian Forest Department (1855–1910)
Jameson Karns, University of California Berkeley

Indigenous knowledge and practices in British colonial and postcolonial forestry networks
Shoko Mizuno, Komazawa University

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Anna Sténs

Anna Sténs

Researcher in history, Umeå University
Forest history, transdisciplinary research

Speakers
avatar for Margarita Dadykina

Margarita Dadykina

Associated Professor, National University Higher School of Economics
ML

Marina Loskutova

Associate Professor, National Research University - Higher School of Economics, St. Petersburg
JK

Jameson Karns

University of California, Berkeley
SM

Shoko Mizuno

Professor, Komazawa University



Saturday August 24, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
A-121

09:00 EEST

9H: Oils: A thousand years of trading, transporting, and transforming soap's raw materials
Organizer: Nancy Shoemaker, University of Connecticut
Chair: Jim Clifford, University of Saskatchewan

The soap trade in the Medieval Islamic Mediterranean: Transit, textiles, and hygiene
Jessica Goldberg, University of California, Los Angeles

The soap boiler’s dilemma: Oil qualities, soap manufacturing, and the global expansion of seventeenth-century England
Nancy Shoemaker, University of Connecticut

The terroir of oil and soap: Imagined landscapes from the Pacific to the Mediterranean
Kate Stevens, University of Waikato

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
JC

Jim Clifford

Associate Professor, University of Saskatchewan

Speakers
JG

Jessica Goldberg

Associate Professor, University of California, Los Angeles
NS

Nancy Shoemaker

Professor of History, University of Connecticut
KS

Kate Stevens

Lecturer, University of Waikato



Saturday August 24, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
S-236

09:00 EEST

9I: International treaties and policies as environmental instruments
Chair: Jan-Henrik Meyer, Max Planck Institute for European Legal History

Challenging the boundaries of environmental history: The hidden environmental chapter of the League of Nations
Omer Aloni, Tel-Aviv University / University of Potsdam

Pass the salt: The contentious role of desalination in achieving sustainable development
Elizabeth Hameeteman, Boston University

Towards an environmental history of the Marshall Plan
Robert Groß, Innsbruck University / University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU)
Dominik Wiedenhofer, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU)

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
JM

Jan-Henrik Meyer

Researcher, Max Planck Institute for European Legal History

Speakers
OA

Omer Aloni

Postdoctoral fellow, Tel-Aviv University
Legal studies International environmental law Deforestation Whaling Sanitation Deforestation Interwar period 20th-century history
avatar for Elizabeth Hameeteman

Elizabeth Hameeteman

PhD Candidate, Boston University
I'm a PhD Candidate in History at Boston University, focusing on sustainable development, environmental law and policy, and all things water. I hold a LL.B. from InHolland University of Applied Sciences in Rotterdam, a BA in American Studies from the University of Groningen, and a... Read More →
avatar for Robert Groß

Robert Groß

University Assistant, BOKU Institute of Social Ecology/Innsbruck University, Institute of History and European Ethnology



Saturday August 24, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
A-224

09:00 EEST

9J: Green activism and popular media
Chair: Joanna Dean, Carleton University

Imaginative mobility and the rise of environmentalism: Political ecology, Japanese anime and the affirmation of a mass ecological conscience
Federico Paolini, Università della Campania L. Vanvitelli

The consequences of nuclear energy: The military–environmental boundary
Nuno Luis Madureira, ISCTE University Institute of Lisbon

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Joanna Dean

Joanna Dean

Associate Professor, History, Carleton University
I am an environmental historian working on the history of human relations with plants and animals. Most recently, I co-edited Animal Metropolis: Histories of Human Animal Relations in Urban Canada (2017). I am currently writing a book about street trees in Ottawa. At the ESEH, I... Read More →

Speakers
FP

Federico Paolini

Professor, Universitą della Campania 'L. Vanvitelli'
avatar for Nuno Luis Madureira

Nuno Luis Madureira

full professor, ISCTE- LISBON UNIVERSITY INSTITUE, CIES
Hi. I am full professor at ISCTE- Lisbon University Institute working on issues related to energy history and environmental history. Currently i am studying nuclear energy



Saturday August 24, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
M-340

09:00 EEST

9K: Roundtable. Environmentalism under authoritarian regimes
Organizer: Viktor Pál, National Research University Higher School of Economics
Chair: Richard Tucker, University of Michigan

Stephen Brain, Mississippi State University
Michel Dupuy, L’Institut d’histoire moderne et contemporaine
Jiří Janáč, Charles University in Prague
Viktor Pál, National Research University Higher School of Economics

Abstract:
Since the early 2000s, authoritarianism has risen as an increasingly powerful global phenomenon. This shift has not only social and political implications, but environmental: authoritarian leaders seek to recast the relationship between society and the government in every aspect of public life, including environmental policy. When historians of technology or the environment have investigated the environmental consequences of authoritarian regimes, they have frequently argued that authoritarian regimes have been unable to produce positive environmental results or adjust successfully to global structural change, if they have shown any concern for the environment at all. Put another way, the scholarly consensus holds that authoritarian regimes on both the left and the right generally have demonstrated an anti-environmentalist bias, and when opposed by environmentalist social movements, have succeeded in silencing those voices. 
This roundtable gathers selected authors of the edited volume “Environmentalism under Authoritarian Regimes” published by Routledge to investigate the scholarly debate about the social and political preconditions necessary for effective environmental protection by analyzing those environmentalist initiatives (interpreted broadly) that authoritarian regimes pursued, and by providing explanations for both the successes and failures that such regimes encountered. 
Scholars present in this roundtable argue that in instances when environmentalist policies offer the possibility of bolstering a country’s domestic (nationalist) appeal or its international prestige, authoritarian regimes can endorse and have endorsed environmental protective measures. Furthermore, when the perceived political advantages of environmentalist policies are sufficiently strong, authoritarian regimes have a competitive advantage over Western democracies in environmental protection due to their effective and centralized decision-making mechanisms, which enable them to target technological and environmental issues promptly. Due to the topicality of this roundtable session, active participation and lively general debate is expected.


Moderators
RT

Richard Tucker

Professor of Environmental History, Mr.

Speakers
SB

Stephen Brain

Associate Professor, Mississippi State University
MD

Michel Dupuy

Associated Researcher, Institut d'Histoire Moderne et Contemporaine (CNRS)
JJ

Jiří Janáč

researcher, Institute of Contemporary History, Czech Academy of Sciences



Saturday August 24, 2019 09:00 - 10:30 EEST
A-346

09:00 EEST

Book Display for the Silent Book Auction
Book display for the Silent Book auction in A-046. Donate your books and go and make your silent bids!

Many of us have their author's copies lying around at home and don't know what to do with all of them. Some of us have bought the same book twice by accident - or get the book they want for present just as they have bought it themselves. What to do with these copies?!

We know: donate them to the Book Auction!!!!! All the money collected at the auction goes to the ESEH.

Want to buy some of these books? Go to the books display and write your bid on the piece of paper between the book. Check several times a day! Someone can go and make a higher bid! Then, at 16.00, the time has come for Dan to call out the winning bids. There you should prepare tons of cash to pay your books immediately, otherwise they go to the second bidder.

Speakers
avatar for Dan Tamir

Dan Tamir

Researcher, University of Zurich
energy, fossil fuels, global politics, degrowth



Saturday August 24, 2019 09:00 - 16:00 EEST
A-046

10:30 EEST

Coffee break
Coffee break is served in two locations: Mare Atrium and Astra Researchers' Forum.


Saturday August 24, 2019 10:30 - 11:00 EEST
Mare Atrium, 3rd floor / Researchers' Forum in Astra Building

11:00 EEST

10A: What makes a steppe?
Organizer: Maya K. Peterson, University of California, Santa Cruz
Chair: Maya K. Peterson, University of California, Santa Cruz

Sunshine and Mare's Milk: The Russian Steppes as Therapeutic Environment
Maya K. Peterson, University of California, Santa Cruz

An unexpected guest from the Eurasian steppe in the American West: Tumbleweed/ Perekati-Pole
David Moon, Nazarbayev University

Forest in the steppe: Plans for the Dnipro wetlands reclamation
Anna Olenenko, Khortytsia National Academy

Life in the khanate of lizards and stones: Literary and scientific narratives of loss and hope
Flora J. Roberts, Leiden University / University of Tübingen

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Flora Roberts

Flora Roberts

postdoc, University of Tübingen, Leiden University
Central Asia, Soviet Union, big dams, rivers, cotton production
avatar for David Moon

David Moon

Professor, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan/University of York, UK
I am currently a visiting professor in the heart of the Eurasian steppe at Nazarbayev University in Nur-Sultan (Astana), Kazakhstan, from my home in the UK. My research has focused on the environmental history of the Eurasian steppes in comparative and transnational contexts. My paper... Read More →
avatar for Anna Olenenko

Anna Olenenko

Dean, Khortytsia National Academy



Saturday August 24, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
S-240

11:00 EEST

10B: “When the rivers run dry”: A cross-continental journey of historical droughts, impacts and human response. Part II
Organizer: Andrea Kiss, Vienna University of Technology
Chair: Christian Pfister, University of Bern

Extreme droughts and human responses to them in the Czech lands
Rudolf Brázdil, Masaryk University
Ladislava Řezníčková, Masaryk University
Petr Dobrovolný, Masaryk University / Global Change Research Institute
Miroslav Trnka, Global Change Research Institute, Czech Academy of Sciences

A place in the sun? Droughts in England 1200–1700
Kathleen Pribyl, University of East Anglia

Consequence or coincidence? Droughts, “pagan“ attacks and locust invasions in Medieval Hungary in an Eastern and Central European context
Andrea Kiss, Vienna University of Technology

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
CP

Christian Pfister

Emeritus researcher, University of Bern
currently I am working on a book related to the history of climate and peope in Europe since the last 1000 yrs. Climatic change, Energy, Economics Population. Extrene events

Speakers
LR

Ladislava Řezníčková

Masaryk University
KP

Kathleen Pribyl

University of East Anglia
AK

Andrea Kiss

s. research scientist, Vienna University of Technology, Austria



Saturday August 24, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
M-225

11:00 EEST

10C: Evaluating post-WWII sustainability
Chair: Otto Latva, University of Turku

Studying entangled histories of raw materials trade and sustainability trade-offs
Frank Veraart, Eindhoven University of Technology (TUE)
Harry Lintsen, Eindhoven University of Technology (TUE)
Jan-Pieter Smits, Eindhoven University of Technology (TUE)
Erik van de Vleuten, Eindhoven University of Technology (TUE)

Diverging roads? Comparing environmental histories of Estonia and Finland during the Cold War
Hannes Palang, Tallinn University
Simo Laakkonen, University of Turku

The boundaries of science in transdisciplinary research: Environmental history in collaborative learning processes
Janina Priebe, Umeå University
Anna Sténs, Umeå University
Erland Mårald, Umeå University

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Otto Latva

Otto Latva

Volunteer/ postdoc / visiting researcher of Tallinn University, Åbo Akademi University
I am a historian and writer, specialized in human-animal studies and the ways in which people of the past perceived the sea environment. I am also interested in many other matters related to the shared past between humans and non-humans. I have a PhD in Cultural History from the University... Read More →

Speakers
EM

Erland Mårald

Professor, Umeå University
avatar for Frank Veraart

Frank Veraart

Assistant Professor, Eindhoven University of Technology
Frank Veraart is an Assistant Professor of history of technology at Eindhoven University of Technology. His areas of expertise include Modern and Contemporary History, Environmental Studies, History of Mobility, Spatial Planning and Computing. Frank’s studies focus on how societal... Read More →
HP

Hannes Palang

Tallinn University
JP

Janina Priebe

Postdoc, Umeå University
Talk to me about living in northern Sweden, Arctic history, Greenland, and forests!
avatar for Anna Sténs

Anna Sténs

Researcher in history, Umeå University
Forest history, transdisciplinary research



Saturday August 24, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
S-238

11:00 EEST

10D: Roundtable. Natural and human economies: Negotiating boundaries in human–insect relations
Chair & Organizer: Anastasia Fedotova, Institute for the History of Science and Technology, Russian Academy of Science

Staffan Müller-Wille, University of Exeter
Dominik Hünniger, University of Hamburg
Ana Isabel Queiroz, IHC, NOVA-FCSH Lisboa
Kerstin Pannhorst, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science
Alejandro Martinez, Universidad Nacional de La Plata

Abstract:
The roundtable will be devoted to economically and medically significant insect species as research objects, and how research on these species crosses the boundaries drawn between human economy and the economy of nature. The topic is deliberately conceived as a very broad one that could potentially be of interest to an array of disciplinary fields beyond the history of science and technology, such as environmental or economic history or the anthropology of human-animal relations. In general, with very few exceptions such as bees or silkworm, insects only catch the attention of researchers when perceived as a threat to the prosperity and well-being of human. It makes sense that medically and economically significant insect species have enjoyed better chances to become privileged research objects; however, there are numerous examples also when some of these species remained under-researched for a long time. 
The historiography of insects has predominantly focused on the conceptual and technological means invested in their eradication. In our panel we want to discuss ways in which such a linear perspective on “applied entomology” can be overcome. The object of applied entomology, we contend, is constituted by dynamic multi-species interactions that undercut any clear-cut analysis in terms of costs and benefits and have fostered a perspective that, on the one hand, turns non-human animals into economic subjects while, on the other hand, aligning human economic activities with biological needs. The models entomologists have developed to understand the dynamics of human-insect interactions, and the enviro-technical interventions that have been based on these models, therefore have always entwined ecological and economical thought and action, contrasting with their divorce in neo-classical economics. Geographic location and environmental conditions, for example, exercise a powerful influence upon what counts as a biological threat posed by insects, and thus might affect the making of specific institutional, regional or national traditions and ‘schools’ within specific fields of study. Moreover, local agents (farmers, craftsmen, hunters, healers, etc.) could possess more nuanced experience in dealing with particular insect species than the entomologists. Growing awareness of the economic importance of such species by the state would thus have pressured metropolitan scholars into changing social and institutional arrangements to tap into these knowledge sources at the periphery, forcing them to leave their familiar environment, relocate to new, often challenging and potentially dangerous milieus, and transcend cultural and linguistic gathering knowledge to be reported back and systematized.


Moderators
avatar for Anastasia Fedotova

Anastasia Fedotova

senior researcher, Institute for the History of Science and Technology, Russian Academy of Science; Mammal Research Institute Polish Acade

Speakers
SM

Staffan Müller-Wille

Associate Professor, University of Exeter
avatar for Dominik Hünniger

Dominik Hünniger

Researcher, University of Hamburg
I am a cultural historian with special interest in 18th century environmental, medical and natural history as well as the history of universities and scholarship. I wrote my first book on the cultural & environmental history of epizootics in Mid-18th century Northern Europe and now... Read More →
KP

Kerstin Pannhorst

Predoctoral Fellow, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science
AM

Alejandro Martinez

Teaching Assistant, Universidad Nacional de La Plata
avatar for Ana Isabel Queiroz

Ana Isabel Queiroz

Researcher, IHC, NOVA-FCSH, Portugal
History of plant pests Starvation, hunger and faminesHistory of nature protection and conservation.



Saturday August 24, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
A-325

11:00 EEST

10E: Migrating to new environments
Chair: Linda Kaljundi, Tallinn University

Skilled peasants: Migration of Italian workers specialized in land reclamation works between Italian regions and from the motherland to the colonies in order to build new territories (1880–1940)
Elisabetta Novello, University of Padua

Climatic boundaries at sea: A case study of Australia’s first fleet migrants
Harriet Mercer, University of Oxford

Forests in immigrants’ life: Exploring Finnish Canadians’ relationship with forests
Jaana Laine, University of Helsinki

Portable natures, or cultivating the outskirts: Italian truck farmers and migrant foodways in New York City, 1890–1940
Gilberto Mazzoli, European University Institute (EUI), Florence

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
Speakers
HM

Harriet Mercer

PhD Candidate, University of Oxford
avatar for Jaana Laine

Jaana Laine

Senior Lecturer, University of Helsinki
My research focus on economic, social and political history on forests and forestry.
GM

Gilberto Mazzoli

Phd Student, European University Institute
EN

Elisabetta Novello

Associate Professor, University of Padua



Saturday August 24, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
M-213

11:00 EEST

10F: The troubled ecological boundaries of a deindustrialized world
Organizers: Renaud Bécot, University of Lyon
Alexandre Elsig, Swiss National Science Foundation
Chair: Pavla Šimková, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich / Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society

Notes for an environmental history of deindustrialization
Alexandre Elsig, Swiss National Science Foundation
Renaud Bécot, University of Lyon

California’s energy transition and its raw materials: Another NIMBY case?
Christophe Roncato Tounsi, University Grenoble Alpes

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
PS

Pavla Šimková

Rachel Carson Center, LMU Munich

Speakers
AE

Alexandre Elsig

University of Lausanne
RB

Renaud Bécot

LARHRA, CNRS - University of Lyon
RT

Roncato Tounsi Christophe

Maître de conférence, University Grenoble Alpes
Environmental history of the American WestGlobal environmental history, energy transition, raw materials



Saturday August 24, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
A-402

11:00 EEST

10G: State forestry and sustainability from a transnational comparative perspective
Organizer: Iva Lucic, Stockholm University
Chair: Wim van Meurs, Radboud University

State forestry in the Netherlands: Between profits and sustainability around 1900
Wim van Meurs, Radboud University

Managing the timber frontier: International forestry congresses and the rescaling of sustainability in the Baltic and North Sea regions, 1870–1914
Christian Lotz, Herder Institute

Self-management, globalisation, and sustainability: Forestry in Early Modern Sweden
Jakob Starlander, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

Whose forests? Contested political and economic dimensions of sustainability in Bosnian forest management (1878–1918)
Iva Lucic, Stockholm University

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Wim van Meurs

Wim van Meurs

Prof., Radboud University of Nijmegen

Speakers
CL

Christian Lotz

Herder Institute
avatar for Jakob Starlander

Jakob Starlander

Phd Student, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala
My research interests are mainly concern early modern forestry, common-pool resource systems, and social and cultural institutions in relation to resource utilization and organization.
IL

Iva Lucic

Researcher, Stockholm University, Department of History



Saturday August 24, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
A-121

11:00 EEST

10H: Soil and economy in the historical perspective in pre-industrial Europe
Organizer: Tomasz Związek, Tadeusz Manteuffel Institute of History, Polish Academy of Sciences
Chair: Verena Winiwarter, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU)

Land assessment and soil classification in 17th century Sweden
Olof Karsvall, Swedish National Archives

Soils and the rural economy of the ecclesiastical estates of Opatówek (Greater Poland) in the long term (1512–1616)
Tomasz Związek, Tadeusz Manteuffel Institute of History, Polish Academy of Sciences
Piotr Guzowski, University of Białystok / Tadeusz Manteuffel Institute of History, Polish Academy of Sciences

The virtuous cycle of return: Soil husbandry in the open fields of Medieval England
Richard Jones, University of Leicester

Demography of historical populations and environmental factors: Could we prove the connection?
Mikołaj Szołtysek, University of Warsaw
Radosław Poniat, University of Białystok
Bartosz Ogórek, Pedagogical University of Cracow

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
VW

Verena Winiwarter

Professor for Environmental History, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences

Speakers
PG

Piotr Guzowski

dr, University of Bialystok
RP

Radosław Poniat

assistant professor, University of Bialystok
OK

Olof Karsvall

The Swedish National Archives
TZ

Tomasz Związek

Research assistant, Tadeusz Manteuffel Institute of History, Polish Academy of Sciences
avatar for Richard Jones

Richard Jones

Associate Professor in Landscape History, University of Leicester
Working through the four elements: have worked for some years on medieval manure and manuring practices/theory; now working on medieval rivers and flooding. Contextualising place-names and extracting their environmental information they contain.



Saturday August 24, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
S-236

11:00 EEST

10I: Environmental policies during the Cold War: Transcending boundaries in national, transnational, and global perspectives
Organizer: Sabina Kubekė, Herder Institute
Chair: Frank Uekötter, University of Birmingham

Bridging boundaries for planet Earth? The emergence of an international climate policy in the 1980s and 1990s
Pascal Pawlitta, Institute for Contemporary History, Munich

Poland and the international environmental cooperation during 1970–1980s
Sabina Kubekė, Herder Institute

A seaside for the future: Yugoslav socialism and the Adriatic projects, 1967–1978
Josef Djordjevski, University of California, San Diego

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
FU

Frank Uekötter

Reader in Environmental Humanities, University of Birmingham

Speakers
PP

Pascal Pawlitta

PhD Researcher, Institut für Zeitgeschichte München - Berlin
SK

Sabina Kubekė

Herder Institute
JD

Josef Djordjevski

University of California - San Diego



Saturday August 24, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
A-224

11:00 EEST

10J: Interpretative boundaries between ecocriticism and environmental history
Organizer: James Smith, Trinity College Dublin
Chair: Finn Arne Jørgensen, University of Stavanger

The flattened object: Hybrid environmental deep mapping in an Omeka collection
James Smith, Trinity College Dublin

Nature made absent? Considerations on doing environmental history with Arabic manuscripts
Torsten Wollina, Independent scholar

How to narrate the non-anthropocentric history of environments
Anna Barcz, Trinity College Dublin

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Finn Arne Jørgensen

Finn Arne Jørgensen

Professor of Environmental History, University of Stavanger
I'm the chair of the program committee for ESEH 2019.

Speakers
avatar for Anna Barcz

Anna Barcz

Trinity Long Room Hub Marie Sk?odowska-Curie Cofund Fellow, Trinity Long Room Hub Arts & Humanities Research Institute, Trinity College Dublin
Currently, I am Trinity Long Room Hub Marie Skłodowska-Curie Cofund Fellow (2018-2019) at Trinity College Dublin. My important books include: Ecorealism: From Ecocriticism to Zoocriticism in Polish Literature (Katowice 2016), Animal Narratives and Culture: Vulnerable Realism (Newcastle... Read More →
JS

James Smith

IRC Government of Ireland Postdoctoral Fellow, Trinity College Dublin
Dr James L. Smith is a Government of Ireland Postdoctoral Fellow based in the department of geography at Trinity College Dublin. He focuses on intellectual history, cultural and spiritual geography, ecocriticism, digital humanities, environmental humanities, spatial humanities and... Read More →
TW

Torsten Wollina

lecturer, Hamburg University



Saturday August 24, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
M-340

11:00 EEST

10K: Advertising Alpine landscapes. Environmental perceptions in Belle Époque tourism
Organizer: Katharina Scharf, University of Salzburg
Chair: Martin Knoll, University of Salzburg

Images of urbanity within a mountain range: Innsbruck as tourism environment and Alpine landscape
Hester Margreiter, University of Salzburg

Making the High Alps accessible for tourists: Cog railways and their role for Belle Époque tourist advertising.
Christian Rohr, University of Bern

Boundless tourism in the Alps? Natural landscapes in Salzburg and Savoy between development and preservation
Katharina Scharf, University of Salzburg

Comment: Robert Groß, Innsbruck University

Abstract available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Martin Knoll

Martin Knoll

Full Professor, University of Salzburg, History Department

Speakers
avatar for Robert Groß

Robert Groß

University Assistant, BOKU Institute of Social Ecology/Innsbruck University, Institute of History and European Ethnology
avatar for Hester Margreiter

Hester Margreiter

University of Salzburg
My dissertation project “Tourism and Urban Dynamics: Structural Effects of Emerging Tourism in New Orleans (Louisiana) and Innsbruck (Tyrol)” aims to discuss the impact of early tourism at the turn of the 19th to the 20th century. Additionally, I study Sociological Theories and... Read More →
avatar for Christian Rohr

Christian Rohr

Full Professor of Environmental and Climate History, Institute of History, University of Bern
avatar for Katharina Scharf

Katharina Scharf

University of Salzburg
Main research so far, at the moment and planned: - Tourism History, Gender History, Environmental History, National Socialism My doctoral thesis is a comparative analysis about tourism’s role in regional transformation processes in Salzburg and Savoy in the 19th and early 20th... Read More →



Saturday August 24, 2019 11:00 - 12:30 EEST
A-346

12:30 EEST

Lunch
Warm lunch is served in two locations: Mare Atrium and Astra Researchers' Forum


Saturday August 24, 2019 12:30 - 14:00 EEST
Mare Atrium, 3rd floor / Researchers' Forum in Astra Building

12:30 EEST

KAJAK Board Meeting

Saturday August 24, 2019 12:30 - 14:00 EEST
A-108

14:00 EEST

Keynote. Alf Hornborg, Lund University. The power of signs: Environmental history as the interfusion of meanings and metabolism
Chair: Riin Magnus, University of Tartu

Keynotes are held in two rooms. Primary room:  A002 (Auditorium Maximum) and second room with a video bridge and more oxygen at A222 (European Hall).  Both audiences get to ask questions!

The power of signs: Environmental history as the interfusion of meanings and metabolism
Abstract:
We do not need to revisit the histories of “idealism” and “materialism” in Western thought to recognize how difficult it is to simultaneously acknowledge the semiotic and the material aspects of social and natural processes. The interaction of subjective and objective factors tends to be so difficult to handle that many academic approaches simply choose to disregard one or the other perspective. Several disciplines in the human sciences are internally divided by this difference in focus, and some have experienced historical oscillations between periods in which one or the other is dominant. An obvious and paradigmatic case is economics. For the past 150 years, economics has been dominated by a preoccupation with human desires and preferences – as measurable in terms of “willingness to pay” – rather than with the management of limited biophysical resources such as land, labor, materials, and energy. Far from “materialist” in outlook, neoclassical economic theory is so detached from the physical constraints of the biosphere that it is continuously being challenged by the heterodox schools of Marxist and ecological economics. Similar tensions divide fields like anthropology, where the obsession with human experience, symbolic systems, and identity tends to delegate concerns with the material conditions for sustainability to the margins. Recent attempts to escape from such anthropocentrism – under the banners of “posthumanism,” “the new materialism,” and “object-oriented ontology” – have also failed to address the specifically human impact on the world. A transdisciplinary field such as environmental history is well positioned to transcend this tenacious dualism and the inclination toward one-sided perspectives. It can neither limit itself to the history of human ideas about the environment nor to the biophysical transformations of landscapes but must examine how the production of cultural meanings intervenes in the material constitution of the biosphere. This means recognizing how even the ostensibly “materialist” concerns of economics hinge on the logic of a peculiar human sign system – that of general-purpose money. After a mere three centuries of global market expansion, this logic is transforming and jeopardizing the Earth System. We urgently need to understand the specific semiotic vehicles through which human meanings intervene in the biosphere, in order to be able to domesticate and restrain the currently disastrous trajectory of global metabolism.

Short bio:
Alf Hornborg is an anthropologist and professor of human ecology at Lund University. He is the author of The Power of the Machine (2001), Global Ecology and Unequal Exchange (2011), Global Magic (2016), and Nature, Society and Justice in the Anthropocene (2019). His research has a special emphasis on how cultural ideas constrain human approaches to economy, technology and ecology.

Moderators
RM

Riin Magnus

University of Tartu
Human-animal interactions, urban nature, semiotics, environmental philosophy, trees

Speakers


Saturday August 24, 2019 14:00 - 15:30 EEST
A002 / A222

15:30 EEST

Book launch coffee break
Book launch coffee break at Researchers’ Forum in Astra building.
Combined Academic Publishers presents “Cultivating Nature” by Sarah Hamilton

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Hamilton

Sarah Hamilton

Associate Professor, Auburn University



Saturday August 24, 2019 15:30 - 16:00 EEST
Researchers' Forum in Astra Building

15:30 EEST

Coffee break
Coffee break is served in two locations: Mare Atrium and Astra Researchers' Forum where it is accompanied by a book launch.


Saturday August 24, 2019 15:30 - 16:00 EEST
Mare Atrium, 3rd floor / Researchers' Forum in Astra Building

16:00 EEST

11A - cancelled
This session is cancelled

Saturday August 24, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
S-240

16:00 EEST

11B: Environmental contexts of famines in Northern Europe
Organizer: Timo Myllyntaus, Turku School of Economics
Chair: Julia Lajus, National Research University Higher School of Economics

The effects of the volcanic eruption of Laki in Iceland, 1783–1785
Ólöf Garðarsdóttir, University of Iceland

Unbearable weather extremes: Meteorological conditions before and during the Finnish famine, 1867–1868
Timo Myllyntaus, Turku School of Economics

Estonian and Finnish Famines of the 1860s in the foreign eyes
Kari Alenius, University of Oulu
Antti K.O. Häkkinen, University of Helsinki

Cultural heritage of Finnish famines: Paavo the peasant and jokes of Laihia’s thriftiness
Jan Kunnas, Independent Scholar

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Julia Lajus

Julia Lajus

Ass. Professor, Higher School of Economics

Speakers
OG

Ólöf Garðarsdóttir

Professor, University of Iceland
Regional Differences in Measles mortality during the Demographic Transition. The case of Northern Sweden 1750-1900Ólöf Garðarsdóttir, Sören EdvinssonThe demographic transition entailed important changes both in mortality rates and mortality patterns in Europe. One important explanation... Read More →
avatar for Timo Myllyntaus

Timo Myllyntaus

Professor of Economic and Social History, Turku School of Economics
Here at this ESEH conference, I organise a session on famines in the Baltic and Nordic countries.
AH

Antti Häkkinen

University of Helsinki
JK

Jan Kunnas

independent scholar



Saturday August 24, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
M-225

16:00 EEST

11C: Eternity costs and wicked legacies: Unacknowledged constraints to a sustainability transformation?
Organizer: Verena Winiwarter, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU)
Chair: Péter Szabó, Institute of Botany, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic

“Eternity is a lot of future”: The wicked legacies of mining
Verena Winiwarter, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU)

Ephemeral benefits, eternal costs? The legacy of Soviet nuclear Industries in Aqtau, Kazakhstan
Stefan Guth, University of Tuebingen

Hydromorphological changes in riverine landscapes as long-term legacies
Martin Schmid, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU)

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Péter Szabó

Péter Szabó

Institute of Botany of the Czech Academy of Sciences

Speakers
VW

Verena Winiwarter

Professor for Environmental History, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences
avatar for Stefan Guth

Stefan Guth

Postdoctoral researcher, University of Tuebingen
avatar for Martin Schmid

Martin Schmid

Associate Professor, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna (BOKU)



Saturday August 24, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
S-238

16:00 EEST

11D: Moving beyond mammals: Histories of insects and fish
Chair: Sandra Swart, Stellenbosch University

Humans vs mosquitoes: Examining the ecological, spatial and temporal boundaries of the Anthropocene
Dan Tamir, University of Zurich

Human–ant negotiated landscapes in nineteenth-century Brazil
Diogo de Carvalho Cabral, University of London

Salmon and servants: Is there a historical truth behind the ecological myth?
Rob Lenders, Radboud University Nijmegen

The marine wild world in a box without boundaries: The aquariums as observatories of living species (1900–1930s)
Inês Amorim, University of Porto, CITCEM / FLUP

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
SS

Sandra Swart

PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITY OF STELLENBOSCH

Speakers
avatar for Inês Amorim

Inês Amorim

Professor, Transdisciplinary Research Centre «Culture, Space and Memory» (CITCEM/FLUP)
FisheriesSalt historyHistory of ScienceClimate HistoryCrop Losses
avatar for Dan Tamir

Dan Tamir

Researcher, University of Zurich
energy, fossil fuels, global politics, degrowth
avatar for Diogo de Carvalho Cabral

Diogo de Carvalho Cabral

Newton International Fellow, School of Advanced Study, University of London
RL

Rob Lenders

Assistant professor, Radboud University Nijmegen



Saturday August 24, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
A-325

16:00 EEST

11E: Beyond the light of the sun: Environmental histories of darkness and light
Organizer: Andrew Flack, University of Bristol
Chair: Dolly Jørgensen, University of Stavanger

The power of the Antarctic night: Lessons from efforts to overwinter at New Zealand’s Vanda Station in the late 1960s and early 1970s
Adrian Howkins, University of Bristol

Earth, fire, water, air: Environmental histories of the underground
Carry van Lieshout, University of Cambridge

What is it like to be a blind fish? Imagining life in the darkness
Andrew Flack, University of Bristol

Finding non-human animals in the history of illumination: Energy boundaries in the English home, 1815–1900 
Karen Sayer, Leeds Trinity University

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
DJ

Dolly Jørgensen

University of Stavanger

Speakers
AH

Adrian Howkins

University of Bristol
CV

Carry van Lieshout

Post-doctoral Researcher, University of Cambridge
AF

Andrew Flack

Lecturer in Modern and Environmental History, University of Bristol
Animal history, science, technology
KS

Karen Sayer

Professor, Leeds Trinity University
Researching C19-20th British social and cultural histories of the rural, the countryside and ‘Nature’, farming and the farmed animal, energy, technology and the body.



Saturday August 24, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
M-213

16:00 EEST

11G: Special session. ”Thanks, but no thanks”: An experimental session on how recurrent failures make us successful anyway, and vice versa
Facilitators:
Roberta Biasillo, KTH Environmental Humanities Laboratory
Daniele Valisena, KTH Environmental Humanities Laboratory

Session abstract: 
The academic job market keeps getting tighter for historians (see recent AHA job reports) and failure is one of the few certainties in our academic lives. From early career positions’ rejections to constant struggles with peer reviewers, fiascos are life-long travel companions of any researcher. Overcoming the sense of failure is high in several universities' agenda, and this means that we are addressing much more than a personal status.
Failures are often invisible: our CVs and institutional bios do not reflect the bulk of our academic efforts — they do not mention failed exams, unsuccessful PhD and fellowship applications, or papers never accepted for publication. At conferences, we talk about the one project that worked, not about the many that failed. 
To try to reverse such a trend, this experimental session invites young and established scholars to “kill our darlings”, our glittered as much as rare successes; to “stay with the failure” and reveal the blank lines of our CVs, share our beloved and never selected research project.
But also academic success happens at the expenses of something else. We are always searching for a brand-new concept, while being interested in research practices, for pushing forward the boundaries of a field or even establishing a new discipline, while campaigning for multi/trans/post-disciplinarity. We long for a project to be granted rather than for granting our project.
Personal stories about failures – due both to rejection and to selection – on the academic job market reminds us that failure is not a reflection of who we are as persons and might inspire ourselves or a colleague to shake off a rejection and start again.
 
Join us if you feel to share your three-minute story of failure (possibly in a funny, ironic and constructive way) and methods that have helped you deal with a frustrated yourself and academic pressure. 
Do we need to feel ashamed of ourselves for our professional disasters? Do we need to hide and dismiss our divergent personal and professional trajectories in order to fulfill and nurture an abstract model of scholar? “Thanks, but no thanks”.


Moderators
RB

Roberta Biasillo

KTH Environmental Humanities Laboratory, Stockholm
avatar for Daniele Valisena

Daniele Valisena

PhD, KTH - Royal Institute of Technology


Saturday August 24, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
A-121

16:00 EEST

11H: Mining and mineral exploitation
Chair: Finn Arne Jørgensen, University of Stavanger

Prospecting the last frontier: Chilean and Japanese perspectives on exploiting Antarctic minerals
Kati Lindström, KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Mining as an envirotechnical system
Lena Asrih, Deutsches Bergbau-Museum Bochum
Nikolai Ingenerf, Deutsches Bergbau-Museum Bochum
Torsten Meyer, Deutsches Bergbau-Museum Bochum

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Finn Arne Jørgensen

Finn Arne Jørgensen

Professor of Environmental History, University of Stavanger
I'm the chair of the program committee for ESEH 2019.

Speakers
avatar for Kati Lindström

Kati Lindström

KTH Royal Institute of Technology / KAJAK
I am the ESEH Regional Representative for the Baltic States - come and join our BALTEHUMS lunch on August 21 if you are interested in the Baltic environmental humanities and social sciences.
LA

Lena Asrih

Deutsches Bergbau-Museum Bochum
TM

Torsten Meyer

Deutsches Bergbau-Museum Bochum



Saturday August 24, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
S-236

16:00 EEST

11I: Nature out of bounds: Representations of the remote and inaccessible
Organizer: Kadri Tüür, Tallinn University
Chair: Anna Antonova, University of Leeds

Coastal nature reserves in Estonian nature writing
Kadri Tüür, Tallinn University / KAJAK

Where the land ends: Literary texts as “place-holders”
Katie Ritson, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society / Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich

Cacophonies of hope: Seagulls in Finnish nature poetry
Karoliina Lummaa, University of Turku

Putting the cartography before the source: Re/producing the past and present Arctic through the map
Roger Norum, University of Oulu
Jonathan Carruthers-Jones, University of Leeds

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
avatar for Anna Antonova

Anna Antonova

Researcher in Residence, Rachel Carson Center
Researcher in Residence at the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society at LMU Munich

Speakers
avatar for Kadri Tüür

Kadri Tüür

head, KAJAK
KR

Katie Ritson

Senior Editor, Rachel Carson Center/LMU Munich
KL

Karoliina Lummaa

Postdoctoral researcher, University of Turku
RN

Roger Norum

University of O



Saturday August 24, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
A-224

16:00 EEST

11J: Environmental change and Soviet Estonian literature
Organizer: Elle-Mari Talivee, Under and Tuglas Literature Centre of the Estonian Academy of Sciences
Chair: Ene-Reet Soovik, University of Tartu

Draining the mire and bringing in the light: Mire practices and their literary representations in Soviet Estonia
Piret Pungas-Kohv, Estonian Fund for Nature
Ene-Reet Soovik, University of Tartu

Industrial mining landscapes in Soviet Estonian fiction
Anu Printsmann, Tallinn University

An industrial border city in fiction and film: Transformations of the environment over time
Elle-Mari Talivee, Under and Tuglas Literature Centre of the Estonian Academy of Sciences

Abstracts available HERE

Moderators
ES

Ene-Reet Soovik

researcher, University of Tartu, Institute of Cultural Research/Institute of Philosophy and Semiotics

Speakers
PP

Piret Pungas-Kohv

expert of environmental awareness, Estonian Fund for Nature
avatar for Anu Printsmann

Anu Printsmann

researcher, Centre for Landscape and Culture, School of Humanities, Tallinn University
avatar for Elle-Mari Talivee

Elle-Mari Talivee

senior researcher, Under and Tuglas Literature Centre of the Estonian Academy of Sciences



Saturday August 24, 2019 16:00 - 17:30 EEST
M-340

17:30 EEST

Silent Book Auction
Come and collect your winning bids!
Cash is king and best if you don't only bring big notes!

Speakers
avatar for Dan Tamir

Dan Tamir

Researcher, University of Zurich
energy, fossil fuels, global politics, degrowth



Saturday August 24, 2019 17:30 - 18:00 EEST
Researchers' Forum in Astra Building

19:00 EEST

Final Ceremony. Closing Reception at Maarjamäe Castle, Estonian History Museum
Pre-reception:
18:00-21:00: The general exhibition of the History Museum is open for the conference delegates
18.00 Tour 1 to the students’ pop-up exhibition on perestroika-period environmental movement in Estonia
18:30 Tour 2 to the student’s pop-up exhibition on perestroika-period environmental movement in Estonia
20:00 Tour 3 to the student’s pop-up exhibition on perestroika-period environmental movement in Estonia

Ceremony:
19:00 Greeting drink
19.15 LOC’s Thank you Speech
LOTS OF FOOD AND DRINK & conference beer!!!!
20:30-21:15 Concert by David Rothenberg
21:15-22:15 ESEH final ceremony, announcement of awards and the new board
22:15-24.00 Party

From University to Maarjamäe (meeting point: Astra registration desk):
17:45 Walking tour I to Maarjamäe
18.15 Walking tour II to Maarjamäe
17:45 Shuttle I leaving from University to Maarjamäe (Mare parking lot, Uus-Sadama 5)
18:00 Shuttle II leaving from University to Maarjamäe (Mare parking lot, Uus-Sadama 5)
18:15 Shuttle III leaving from University to Maarjamäe (Mare parking lot, Uus-Sadama 5)
18:45 Shuttle IV leaving from University to Maarjamäe (Mare parking lot, Uus-Sadama 5)

Public transport from "Uus-Sadama" bus stop to "Maarjamäe" (buses 1A, 5, 8, 34A, 38):
17:44 (1A); 17:46 (34A); 17:53 (5); 17:56 (8); 17:58 (1A); 18:02 (5); 18:04 (38); 18:05 (34A); 18:18 (5); 18:22 (8); 18:30 (34A); 18:35 (5), 18:45 (8), 18:53 (34A)

Organized transport back to town:
23:00 Shuttle I leaving from Maarjamäe to University
23:30 Shuttle II leaving from Maarjamäe to University
24:00 Shuttle III leaving from Maarjamäe to University
24:00 Shuttle IV leaving from Maarjamäe to University
Last public transport from "Maarjamäe" to City (buses 1A, 5, 8, 34A):
22:47 (38); 23:03 (8); 23:07 (5); 23:12 (24A); 23:23 (1A); 23:25 (8); 23:27 (5); 23:37 (34A); 23:42 (1A); 23:47 (5 and 8); 00:09 (5).



Saturday August 24, 2019 19:00 - 23:59 EEST
Maarjamäe Castle
 
Sunday, August 25
 

08:00 EEST

Eastern Estonia: Industrial and coastal environments
Start of excursion: 8:00, Tallinn University, Mare House parking lot, Uus-Sadama 5
End of excursion: 22(23):00, Tallinn University, Mare House parking lot, Uus-Sadama 5

The price includes transportation, lunch and little picnic-bag (evening), admission tickets and excursion.
This excursion explores the industrial environments of Eastern Estonia. We will visit the oil shale industry in Kiviõli and the Kreenholm manufacture, which dates back to the Czarist period and is being developed into an industrial heritage site. In the territory of the Kreenholm manufacture, an overview is also given of problems related to the fishery of Lake Peipsi, Narva River and Narva Estuary from the mid-nineteenth century, and especially after the creation of the Narva Reservoir in 1955 which has left the waterfalls on Narva River dry most of the year. The excursion ends with a short walk in Narva and the so-called Venice of Narva, which is the nickname for the canals and boatsheds of the Narva reservoir.

The tour guide Erki Tammiksaar is the director of the the Centre for Science Studies at the Estonian University of Life Sciences and senior research associate at the University of Tartu. His scholarly interests include the history of the natural sciences at the University of Tartu in the nineteenth century, the role of the St. Petersburg Academy of Sciences in the Russian Empire, the political activities of Baltic-German scientists in the Russian Empire, and the development of oil shale industry in Estonia.

Speakers
ET

Erki Tammiksaar

Estonian University of Life Sciences/ University of Tartu


Sunday August 25, 2019 08:00 - 21:00 EEST
Mare Building Parking Lot

09:00 EEST

Excursion to Paldiski: Places, power and the physical: from Padise to Paldiski, from medieval to Soviet ideas shaping the environment in North Estonia
Start of the excursion : 9:00, Tallinn University, Mare House parking lot, Uus-Sadama 5
End of the excursion : 16:00, Tallinn University, Mare House parking lot, Uus-Sadama 5

This day-trip is based on synthesising the experience of a historical geographer examining the past of the Pakri peninsula and the northern coast of Estonia west of its capital city of Tallinn. The ecological, social, and cultural boundedness is revealed by a tour guide taking visitors around a landscape where both the human-built environment and nature reach their respective limits (for Estonia) – and provide plentiful possibilities for past, present, and future interpretation. The focus is on the ways how the environment has dictated the creation of places at different times in history and what stories we tell about such places today. We visit the nineteenth-century neo-Gothic Keila-Joa manor by a waterfall, the Pakri peninsula with its 'ice-free and ideal' harbour town and military base of Paldiski, which dates back to the Russian empire, but is especially known for having been one of the nuclear submarine training bases of the Soviet Union. Thereafter, we will have a picnic on the coastal cliff (Glint) on Pakerort or by the St Matthias church; and finally explore the ruins of the medieval Padise Cistercian monastery.

Tour guide Tiina Peil is a historical geographer interested in interactions of people and nature over time. Her research has focused on islands and coastal culture, landscape and home; history of environmental ideas and the practices of geography. Recent research themes include urban (environmental) history; travel and tourism and their impact on the local environment. As a guide of special tours focusing on Estonian landscape history, art and architecture, she has 25 years of experience. Her book ‘The town that never was – Paldiski’ is forthcoming this year.

Speakers
TP

Tiina Peil

Södertörn University


Sunday August 25, 2019 09:00 - 16:00 EEST
Mare Building Parking Lot

09:00 EEST

Lahemaa National Park: Community-based Creativity and 50 years of heritage protection
Start of the excursion : 9:00, Tallinn University, Mare House parking lot, Uus-Sadama 5
End of the excursion : 18:00, Tallinn University, Mare House parking lot, Uus-Sadama 5

During this day-trip we are visiting the homes, villages and landscapes of the people of Lahemaa. The Lahemaa National Park was founded in 1971. Since establishment, Lahemaa National Park has been a fascinating and inspiring place for those keen on nature and cultural heritage. Lahemaa has given rise to many trends common in modern-day nature protection: for instance, the entanglement of nature protection and human activities, the holistic conception of the protection of cultural heritage, the empowerment of local communities, and the use of art and creativity in environmental education. The focus of this trip is on innovation that creates and maintains values.
The highlights of Lahemaa natural and cultural values are presented by the locals who carry the heritage. We start the day with most visited nature trail in Estonia – Viru Bog trail. Next, we are invited to Muuksi historical landscapes, were humans have been active since mesolithicum and biodiversity reaches its peak in seminatural alvars. We approach the Sea in the former Hara Soviet Military harbour and submarine base which is now conquered by the local villagers and young sailors. We have lunch in one of the best private Estonian Art collections in Viinistu Art Museum which is situated in former Viinistu village Fish factory. We continue our path in Käsmu peninsula forest and erratic stonefield, Käsmu village and maritime museum. The day ends in the Centre of the Lahemaa National Park that is located in the historical Palmse manor complex with its own pioneering history and the history of national park. The journey is guided by Ave Paulus, a specialist of cultural heritage.

Tour guide Ave Paulus has studied history and conservation, semiotics and theory of culture. She has a master’s degree from the University of Tartu and the Estonian Academy of Arts on the protection of vernacular heritage and local community rights. Her PhD studies in semiotics at the University of Tartu focus on the rights-based approach in cultural heritage protection in European National parks. Her research interests as well as professional activities are directly related to cultural heritage management in cooperation with heritage communities. Since 2003, she has worked in the field of cultural heritage protection in Lahemaa national park. She is the specialist for cultural heritage in the Environmental Board of Estonia, council member of Virumaa Museums, Spokesperson of intangible heritage, and a private enterpreneur. Ave Paulus is member of ICOMOS International cultural landscapes committee and RB working group, Estonian Heritage and Nature Societies.

Speakers
avatar for Ave Paulus

Ave Paulus

PhD candidate, Tartu University
Ave Paulus is a specialist for cultural heritage issues in the Environmental Board of Estonia, Council member of Virumaa Museums, Spokesperson of the intangible heritage of the Folk Culture Centre, Board member of Lahemaa and Alutaguse National Park Cooperation Councils. She is a... Read More →


Sunday August 25, 2019 09:00 - 18:00 EEST
Mare Building Parking Lot